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A Hunger Artist

By: Franz Kafka

During these last decades the interest in professional fasting has markedly diminished. It used to pay very well to stage such great performances under one's own management, but today that is quite impossible. We live in a different world now. At one time the whole town took a lively interest in the hunger artist; from day to day of his fast the excitement mounted; everybody wanted to see him at least once a day; there were people who bought season tickets for the last f...

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To the Lighthouse

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: ?Yes, of course, if it's fine tomorrow, said Mrs Ramsay. But you'll have to be up with the lark, she added.

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Three Guineas

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: Three years is a long time to leave a letter unanswered, and your letter has been lying without an answer even longer than that. I had hoped that it would answer itself, or that other people would answer it for me. But there it is with its question--How in your opinion are we to prevent war?--still unanswered.

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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

By: Mary Wollstonecraft

Fiction

Excerpt: DEDICATION To M. Talleyrand-Perigord, Late Bishop Of Autun. Sir, Having read with great pleasure a pamphlet which you have lately published, I dedicate this volume to you; to induce you to reconsider the subject, and maturely weigh what I have advanced respecting the rights of woman and national education: and I call with the firm tone of humanity; for my arguments, Sir, are dictated by a disinterested spirit- I plead for my sex- not for myself. Independence I h...

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Woolf Essays

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: THE COMMON READER There is a sentence in Dr. Johnson's Gray which might well be written up in all those rooms, too humble to be called libraries, yet full of books, where the pursuit of reading is carried on by private people. ... I rejoice to concur with the common reader; for by the common sense of readers, uncorrupted by literary prejudices, after all the refinements of subtilty and the dogmatism of learning, must be finally decided all claim to poetical hon...

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The Waves

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: The sun had not yet risen. The sea was indistinguishable from the sky, except that the sea was slightly creased as if a cloth had wrinkles in it. Gradually as the sky whitened a dark line lay on the horizon dividing the sea from the sky and the grey cloth became barred with thick strokes moving, one after another, beneath the surface, following each other, pursuing each other, perpetually.

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Orlando: A Biography

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Preface: Many friends have helped me in writing this book. Some are dead and so illustrious that I scarcely dare name them, yet no one can read or write without being perpetually in the debt of Defoe, Sir Thomas Browne, Sterne, Sir Walter Scott, Lord Macaulay, Emily Bronte, De Quincey, and Walter Pater,--to name the first that come to mind. Others are alive, and though perhaps as illustrious in their own way, are less formidable for that very reason. I am specially indeb...

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Night and Day

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: It was a Sunday evening in October, and in common with many other young ladies of her class, Katharine Hilbery was pouring out tea. Perhaps a fifth part of her mind was thus occupied, and the remaining parts leapt over the little barrier of day which interposed between Monday morning and this rather subdued moment, and played with the things one does voluntarily and normally in the daylight. But although she was silent, she was evidently mistress of a situation ...

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Monday or Tuesday

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: A HAUNTED HOUSE. Whatever hour you woke there was a door shunting. From room to room they went, hand in hand, lifting here, opening there, making sure--a ghostly couple. Here we left it, she said. And he added, Oh, but here too! It's upstairs, she murmured. And in the garden, he whispered Quietly, they said, or we shall wake them.

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Between the Acts

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: It was a summer's night and they were talking, in the big room with the windows open to the garden, about the cesspool. The county council had promised to bring water to the village, but they hadn't. Mrs. Haines, the wife of the gentleman farmer, a goosefaced woman with eyes protruding as if they saw something to gobble in the gutter, said affectedly: What a subject to talk about on a night like this!

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A Room of One's Own

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction--what, has that got to do with a room of one's own? I will try to explain. When you asked me to speak about women and fiction I sat down on the banks of a river and began to wonder what the words meant. They might mean simply a few remarks about Fanny Burney; a few more about Jane Austen; a tribute to the Bront‰s and a sketch of Haworth Parsonage under snow; some witticisms if possible about Miss Mi...

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La-Bas

By: Joris Karl Huysmans

You believe pretty thoroughly in these things, or you wouldn't abandon the eternal triangle and the other stock subjects of the modern novelists to write the story of Gilles de Rais, and after a silence Des Hermies added, I do not object to the latrine; hospital; and workshop vocabulary of naturalism. For one thing, the subject matter requires some such diction. Again, Zola, in L'Assommoir, has shown that a heavy-handed artist can slap words together hit-or-miss and give...

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Manfred

By: Lord Byron

MANFRED. The lamp must be replenish'd, but even then / It will not burn so long as I must watch. / My slumbers -- if I slumber -- are not sleep, / But a continuance of enduring thought, / Which then I can resist not: in my heart / There is a vigil, and these eyes but close / To look within; and yet I live, and bear / The aspect and the form of breathing men. / But grief should be the instructor of the wise; / Sorrow is knowledge: they who know the most / Must mourn the d...

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Heaven and Earth

By: Lord Byron

Though through space infinite and hoary / Before thy bright wings worlds be driven, / Yet hear! / Oh! think of her who holds thee dear! / And though she nothing is to thee, / Yet think that thou art all to her. / Thou canst not tell,—and never be / Such pangs decreed to aught save me,— / The bitterness of tears. / Eternity is in thine years...

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Europe : A Prophecy

By: William Blake

`Five windows light the cavern'd Man: thro' one he breathes the air; Thro' one hears music of the spheres; thro' one the Eternal Vine Flourishes, that he may receive the grapes; thro' one can look And see small portions of the Eternal World that ever groweth; Thro' one himself pass out what time he please, but he will not; For stolen joys are sweet, and bread eaten in secret pleasant.'...

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The Land of Heart's Desire

By: William Butler Yeats

SCENE. A room with a hearth on the floor in the middle of a deep alcove to the Right. There are benches in the alcove and a table; and a crucifix on the wall. The alcove is full of a glow of light from the fire. There is an open door facing the audience to the Left, and to the left of this a bench. Through the door one can see the forest. It is night, but the moon or a late sunset glimmers through the trees and carries the eye far off into a vague, mysterious World.

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The Inca of Perusalem

By: George Bernard Shaw

The twelfth of May, 1796, in north Italy, at Tavazzano, on the road from Lodi to Milan. The afternoon sun is blazing serenely over the plains of Lombardy, treating the Alps with respect and the anthills with indulgence, not incommoded by the basking of the swine and oxen in the villages nor hurt by its cool reception in the churches, but fiercely disdainful of two hordes of mischievous insects which are the French and Austrian armies. Two days before, at Lodi, the Austri...

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Getting Married

By: George Bernard Shaw

Exception has been taken to the title of this seeming tomfoolery on the ground that the Catherine it represents is not Great Catherine, but the Catherine whose gallantries provide some of the lightest pages of modern history. Great Catherine, it is said, was the Catherine whose diplomacy, whose campaigns and conquests, whose plans of Liberal reform, whose correspondence with Grimm and Voltaire enabled her to cut such a magnificent figure in the eighteenth century. In rep...

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Icarus

By: Bertrand Russell

In dark days, men need a clear faith and a well-grounded hope; and as the outcome of these, the calm courage which takes no account of hardships by the way. The times through which we are passing have afforded to many of us a confirmation of our faith. We see that the things we had thought evil are really evil, and we know more definitely than we ever did before the directions in which men must move if a better world is to arise on the ruins of the one which is now hurli...

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Die Aufzeichnungen des Malte Laurid Brigge

By: Rainer Marie Rilke

THIS volume discloses the mental operations of perhaps the most thoroughly practical politician of the day-George Washington Plunkitt, Tammany leader of the Fifteenth Assembly District, Sachem of the Tammany Society and Chairman of the Elections Committee of Tammany Hall, who has held the offices of State Senator, Assemblyman', Police Magistrate, County Supervisor and Alderman, and who boasts of his record in filling four public offices in one year and drawing salaries f...

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