World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

International Surfing Day

 

International Surfing Day

International Surfing Day, held annually on or near the date of the summer solstice[1] (held June 20[2]), is an unofficial, environmentally conscious[3] sports-centered holiday that celebrates the sport of surfing and the surfing lifestyle, and the sustainability of ocean resources.[4][5] Contests and prizes[6] are also part of the celebration, with surfing-related industries donating prizes such as surfboards and wetsuits.[3] Another purpose of the celebration is to promote the popularity of surfing and to attract new participants.[7]

Contents

  • History 1
    • Extent of celebrations 1.1
  • See also 2
  • Notes 3
  • External links 4

History

A Naupaka plant

International Surfing Day was established in 2004[8] by

  • International Surfing Day Official website
  • Official MySpace page
  • International Surfing Day Social Network

External links

  1. ^ a b c Surf's up by Jen Ingan, New Times, Strokes and Plugs, June 19, 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s [[1]
  3. ^ a b c International Surfing Day Gets Challenging, Surfline, Press Release, June 16, 2008, access date June 26, 2008
  4. ^ The Third Annual International Surfing Day is back Friday June 20th, by Nicole DeJesus, access date June 27, 2008
  5. ^ a b c International Surfing Day Clean Up Set for June 21, By Jenna Ishii, 6/9/2008, Hawaii Reporter, access date June 27, 2008
  6. ^ a b International Surfing Day announces challenges & prizes, SurfersVillage, 16 June 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j (English) & (French)Surfing Day celebrated on beaches throughout Europe/UNE VAGUE SANS FRONTIERES !, June 25, 2008, Surfers Village, access date June 30, 2008
  8. ^ a b c projects focus of Surf Day petition, by Sarah Webster, APP.com, June 22, 2008, access date June 25, 2008
  9. ^ a b c d O.C., A.C. celebrate surfing 'holiday' today by Jon Coen, For The Press/PressOfAtalnticCity.com, June 20, 2008, access date June 25, 2008
  10. ^ a b c d International Surfing Day Gets Challenging, June 16, 2008, access date June 25, 2008
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ a b (Spanish)Conciencia ecológica en el Día Mundial del Surf, La Capital (newspaper), access date June 27, 2008
  13. ^ a b c On The Sidelines, Newport News Times, June 20, 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  14. ^ Surfers have global mission, SeaCoastOnline, access date June 22, 2008
  15. ^ a b Lake Worth: International Surfing Day to be marked at city beach, June 16, 2008, Lake Worth Sun-Sentinel, access date June 26, 2008
  16. ^ a b Harbor gets a Surfing Day cleanup, by Rachale Gehrlein, June 25, 2008, access date June 26, 2008
  17. ^ Surfrider Foundation hosts Hookipa cleanup, The Maui News, June 18, 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  18. ^ a b SAS celebrate International Surfing Day at the Gold Coast Festival, 20 June 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  19. ^ News International Surfing Day by Richard Hardy, June 19, 2008, Drift Surf Magazine, access date June 26, 2008
  20. ^ El Salvador Takes International Surfing Day To New Heights, by Emilia Estrada, Surfing Magazine, access date June 27, 2008
  21. ^ (Spanish)El viernes 20 de Junio se celebra el Día Internacional del Surf 2008, by Carlos Cohen, Surfeando, 18 June 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  22. ^ Justin Beard: Board Meeting, by Justin Beard, June 19, 2008, access date June 27, 2008
  23. ^ ESA Georgia Surf Contest This Weekend, TransWorldSurf, June 24, 2008, access date June 25, 2008
  24. ^ Brick Beach III to hold International Surf Day, Brick Township Bulletin, access date June 26, 2008
  25. ^ International Surfing Day on Friday - Summer of Surf Celebration This Weekend on Folly Beach, Moultrie News, June 18, 2008, access date June 27, 2008

Notes

See also

In Africa, the two French territories of Réunion and Mayotte[7] hold annual festivities alongside Morocco,[7] Ghana, the Spanish insular area of the Canary Islands[7] and South Africa. The day has also taken hold in some other countries such as Israel,[7] Japan,[2] and South Korea.

In North America the surfing day is most widely observed and celebrations may be found in [23] Maine,[2] Maryland,[2] New Jersey,[8][9][24] New York,[2] North Carolina,[2] Oregon,[13] South Carolina,[25] Texas,[2] and Virginia.[2] After North America the observance has the most popularity in Europe: including in most of the coastal European Union and it is held by surf enthusiasts in France,[2][7] Italy,[7] the United Kingdom,[2][18] Portugal,[7] Spain,[7] and Belgium.[2] Further European celebrations are held in Norway,[7] in addition to many of the EU nations overseas possessions.

International Surf Day events have been held on all populated continents including South America where it is celebrated in Argentina,[12] Brazil,[2] and Peru.[2] Also in the Southern Hemisphere the holiday is observed in the Oceanian nations of Australia[19] and New Zealand.[2] The day is also widely observed in the American state of Hawaii, also in Oceania.[5][16]

Extent of celebrations

Direct action was used by form of protest on this day in England to express opposition to sewage in the waters of the Gold Coast; a precarious problem for many surfers who become infected by the bacteria from open wounds from sports-related injuries.[18]

[17][1] (a flowering coastal plant) in Hawaii.Naupaka such as lobbying to maintain the recreation areas in California where surfing occurs, or planting [5] and other activities[13] dune and other habitat restoration[16][15][14][10][9][8]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.