World Library  



Women Writers Collection


Women Writers Collection is a collection of the most influential works by women written in English from the seventeenth century through the nineteenth century. Many of these titles are considered to be part of the canon of today’s feminism movement.

 
  • Cover Image

Life in Mexico

By: Frances Calder¢n De La Barca

Fiction

Excerpt: Oct. 27th, 1839. This morning, at ten o'clock, we stepped on board the steamboat Hercules, destined to convey us to our packet with its musical name. The day was foggy and gloomy, as if refusing to be comforted, even by an occasional smile from the sun. All prognosticated that the Norma would not sail to-day, but where there's a will, etc. Several of our friends accompanied us to the wharf; the Russian Minister, the Minister of Buenos Ayres, Mr. ?, who tried har...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Maria or the Wrongs of Woman

By: Mary Wollstonecraft

Fiction

Preface: THE PUBLIC are here presented with the last literary attempt of an author, whose fame has been uncommonly extensive, and whose talents have probably been most admired, by the persons by whom talents are estimated with the greatest accuracy and discrimination. There are few, to whom her writings could in any case have given pleasure, that would have wished that this fragment should have been suppressed, because it is a fragment. There is a sentiment, very dear to...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Mary

By: Mary Wollstonecraft

Fiction

Excerpt: ADVERTISEMENT. In delineating the Heroine of this Fiction, the Author attempts to develop a character different from those generally portrayed. This woman is neither a Clarissa, a Lady G??, nor a [A] Sophie.?It would be vain to mention the various modifications of these models, as it would to remark, how widely artists wander from nature, when they copy the originals of great masters. They catch the gross parts; but the subtile spirit evaporates; and not having ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Memoir of Elizabeth Jones

By: Little Indian Girl

Fiction

Excerpt: ACCOUNT OF ELIZABETH'S FAMILY. Strongest minds Are often those of whom the noisy world Hears least.--WORDSWORTH. THE subject of the following memoir was a little Indian girl, whose life's short history was rendered peculiarly interesting by circumstances of no common occurrence. Her father, Mr. John Jones, whose Indian name is Tyentenegen, is an Indian of the Oojebway* nation, and brother to the Rev. Peter Jones, otherwise Kahkewaquonaby, known as a Missionary t...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Memoirs of an Arabian Princess

By: Lionel Strachey

Fiction

Excerpt: AUTHENTICITY OF THESE MEMOIRS. THE work of which a translation is here offered originally came out as Memoiren einer arabischen Prinzessin. Published by a Berlin firm in 1886, it was immediately followed by an English edition, which seems to have attracted little interest, both the German and the English versions soon falling into obscurity and going out of print. When these memoirs appeared, however, Germany's colonial ambitions were newly fledged; the British ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Memoirs of Madame de Motteville, Volume I

By: Madame De Motte Ville

Fiction

Excerpt: 1644-1645. AT the beginning of the regency the queen had established a council of conscience, at which were decided all matters concerning benefices, the choice of bishops and abb‚s, and the distribution of pensions that she wished to give to the glory of God and the advantage of religion. This council existed as long as the minister, seeing his authority thwarted, remained under some restraint; but as soon as he had acquired complete dominion over the queen's m...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Monday or Tuesday

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: A HAUNTED HOUSE. Whatever hour you woke there was a door shunting. From room to room they went, hand in hand, lifting here, opening there, making sure--a ghostly couple. Here we left it, she said. And he added, Oh, but here too! It's upstairs, she murmured. And in the garden, he whispered Quietly, they said, or we shall wake them.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Mrs. Dalloway

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself. For Lucy had her work cut out for her. The doors would be taken off their hinges; Rumpelmayer's men were coming. And then, thought Clarissa Dalloway, what a morning--fresh as if issued to children on a beach.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Mrs. Jamess Vindication of the Church of England

By: Elinor James

Fiction

Excerpt: ? Defends James II, the Book of Common Prayer and the Church of England. Argues against a pamphlet written by John Dryden. Author says she realizes the king will question a woman's involvement but claims she is concerned about her country.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Munds Mulberries

Fiction

Excerpt: Lengthy poetic burlesque satirizes women's vanity and criticizes them for reading romances, seeing plays and farces, and otherwise entertaining themselves. She nostalgically regards the age of chivalry and includes a fop-dictionary. It is intended as a guide for young gentlemen preparing to depart for university. Evelyn was the daughter of royal diarist John Evelyn. The Ladies Dressing-Room Unlock'd, And Her Toilette Spread, Together, With A Fop-Dictionary, And ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

My People

By: Angel De Cora (Hinook-Mahiwi-Kilinaka)

Fiction

Excerpt: A great many have heard of Winnebago Indians, but very few have taken the trouble to study the character of the tribe. Many have passed through the reservation and their remarks are anything but flattering. The Winnebagoes were moved to their present home in the northeastern part of Nebraska in 1863 during the Sioux trouble. Since then very little has been done towards the civilization of the tribe,--that is, civilization in its truest meaning. Most of the India...

Read More
  • Cover Image

My Three Years in Manipur

By: Ethel St. Clair Grimwood

Fiction

Read More
  • Cover Image

Night and Day

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: It was a Sunday evening in October, and in common with many other young ladies of her class, Katharine Hilbery was pouring out tea. Perhaps a fifth part of her mind was thus occupied, and the remaining parts leapt over the little barrier of day which interposed between Monday morning and this rather subdued moment, and played with the things one does voluntarily and normally in the daylight. But although she was silent, she was evidently mistress of a situation ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Nineteenth-Century American Suffragists in the News

By: Various

Fiction

Excerpt: Speeches By Mrs. Lucy Stone (Blackwell), Mrs. Mary F. Davis, Mrs. Elizabeth Jones and Mr. Wendell Phillips. In response to a call from Mrs. Paulina Wright Davis and Mrs. Lucy Stone (Blackwell), President and Secretary of the last year's Woman's Rights Convention, those interested in Woman's Rights met yesterday morning, in the Tabernacle, to the number of a thousand. Three-fourths of those present were ladies.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Not Slavery and a Truce, But Emancipation and Peace

By: Mattie Griffith

Fiction

Excerpt: To the Editor of The Independent: SIR: Your readers may probably find interest in a brief statement-which I desire to make-of the origin and single object of an Association of ladies lately organized in this city under the title of the Women's Loyal National League.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Sweet Singer

By: Mabel Washbourne Anderson

Fiction

Excerpt: Spavinaw is the most beautiful stream in the Cherokee Nation. Nourished by the sparkling waters of the many springs in that locality, it winds like a shining thread of crystal through the narrow valleys between the hills which bear its name; curving its way by circuitous route, as if reluctant to leave its native hills, the murmur of whose pines chant a tuneful accompaniment to the music of its waters.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Omaha Legends and Tent Stories

By: Susette La Flesche

Fiction

Excerpt: To the readers of Wide Awake: These legends, a few of which I have translated, are nearly the same in every tribe--a little varied, it is true--but substantially the same, which shows, I think, that they are of common origin. These which I have translated, are as told by the Omaha tribe. I have written them down just as they were told to me by my father, mother and grandmother, only of course I have translated them into English.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Orlando: A Biography

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Preface: Many friends have helped me in writing this book. Some are dead and so illustrious that I scarcely dare name them, yet no one can read or write without being perpetually in the debt of Defoe, Sir Thomas Browne, Sterne, Sir Walter Scott, Lord Macaulay, Emily Bronte, De Quincey, and Walter Pater,--to name the first that come to mind. Others are alive, and though perhaps as illustrious in their own way, are less formidable for that very reason. I am specially indeb...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Our Greatest Want

By: Frances Ellen Watkins

Fiction

Excerpt: Leading ideas impress themselves upon communities and countries. A thought is evolved and thrown out among the masses, they receive it and it becomes inter-woven with their mental and moral life--if the thought be good the receivers are benefited, and helped onward to the truer life; if it is not, the reception of the idea is a detriment. A few earnest thinkers, and workers in-fuse into the mind of Great Britain, a sentiment of human brotherhood. The hue and cry...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Poems by Mattie Griffith

By: Mattie Griffith

Fiction

Excerpt: The Dying Girl. THROW open yonder window, sister dear, For all seems gloomy and oppressive here; I feel, alas! that I am dying now, But the warm breeze may breathe upon my brow, And o'er my heart a soft and holy spell, Bidding my faint and failing spirit swell With the dear thoughts and visions that had power To brighten life in childhood's fairy hour. I go, sweet sister, to yon far blue land Where dwell the blest, a bright, angelic band, Where radiant spirits c...

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 41 - 60 of 103 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.