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Classic Christian books in electronic format, selected for your edification. There is enough good reading material here to last you a lifetime, if you give each work the time it deserves!

 
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The Christian in Complete Armour

Excerpt: ?Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand. ?Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness; and your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace; above all, taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of th...

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Part Second Directions for Managing This War Successfully, With So...

Excerpt: This verse is a key to the former, wherein the apostle had exhorted believers to encourage and bear up their fainting spirits on the Lord, and the power of his might. Now in these words he explains himself, and shows how he would have them do this, not presumptuously [to] come into the field without that armour which God hath appointed to be worn by all his soldiers, and yet with a bravado, to trust to the power of God to save them. That soul is sure to fall sho...

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Direction VIII-Second General Part

Excerpt: ?Whereby ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked? (Eph. 6:16) We have done with the exhortation, and now come to the second general part of the verse, viz. a powerful argument pressing this exhortation, contained in these words--?Whereby ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked.? ?Ye shall be able.? Not an uncertain ?may be ye shall;? but he is peremptory and absolute--?ye shall be able.? But what to do? ?able to quench?-...

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Direction I-Second General Part

Excerpt: These words present us with the reason why the Christian soldier is to be thus completely armed, ?That ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.? The strength of this argument lies in these two particulars [or branches]. FIRST, The danger, if unarmed. The enemy is no mean contemptible one, no less than the devil, set out as a cunning engineer by his wiles and stratagems. SECOND, The certainty of standing against all his wits and wiles, if we be thu...

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Direction Ninth

Excerpt: These words present us with another piece of the Christian?s panoply--a helmet to cover his head in the day of battle--THE HELMET OF SALVATION. It makes the fifth in the apostle?s order. And, which is observable, this, with most of the pieces in this magazine, are defensive arms, and all to defend the Christian from sin, none to secure him from suffering. FIRST. They are most defensive arms. Indeed, there is but one of all the pieces in the whole panoply for off...

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Direction Second the Nature of the War, And Character of the Assai...

Excerpt: The Words are coupled to the precedent with the casual particle ?for,? which either refers to the two foregoing verses--and then they are a further reason, pressing the necessity of Christian fortitude in the tenth verse, and furniture in the eleventh--or else to the last words in the eleventh verse, where the apostle having descried the saints? grand enemy to be Satan, and described him in one of his attributes--his wily subtlety--he in this further displays hi...

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Direction Tenth

Excerpt: Here we have the sixth and last piece in the Christian?s panoply brought to our hand--A SWORD; and that of the right make--?the sword of the Spirit.? The sword was ever esteemed a most necessary part of the soldier?s furniture, and therefore hath obtained a more general use in all ages, and among all nations, than any other weapon. Most nations have some particular weapons or arms proper to themselves; but few or none come into the field without a sword. A pilot...

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Division Second-The Assailants Described Positively

Excerpt: The apostle having shown what the saint?s enemies are not, flesh and blood, frail men, who cannot come but they are seen, who may be resisted by man?s power, or escaped by flight; now he describes the positively, ?against principalities, against powers,? &c. Some think [that] the apostle by these divers names and titles, intends to set forth the distinct orders, whereby the devils are subordinate one to another; so they make the devil, ver. 11, to be the head or...

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Direction Eleventh

Excerpt: We have at last set before you the Christian in his armour; and now he wants nothing to furnish him for the battle, or enable him for the victory, but the presence of his general to lead him on, and bring him honourably off again by the wisdom of his conduct; which, that he may obtain, the apostle sets him to prayer--?praying always,? &c. As if he had said, ?You have now, Christian, the armour of God; but take heed thou forgettest not to engage God of this armou...

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Direction Third

Excerpt: The Apostle in these words reassumes his former exhortation mentioned, ver. 11, and presseth it with a new force, from that more particular discovery which he gives of the enemy, ver. 12, where, like a faithful scout, he makes a full report of Satan?s great power and malice; and also discloseth what a dangerous design he hath upon the saints--no less than to despoil them of all that is heavenly--from all which he gives them a second alarm, and bids them ?Arm! ar...

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Direction Xi-Second General Part

Excerpt: Having dispatched the duty of prayer in general, we now come to give an account of the several branches in the exhortation; which together make up an excellent DIRECTORY to the Christian for his better performing of this duty. Indeed, the apostle here not only teacheth the Christian how to pray, but the minister how to preach, in that he doth not nakedly tell them what is their duty--and so leave them to their own skill in the management of it; but that he may f...

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Direction Fifth

Excerpt: The apostle having ordered the Ephesians, and in them every Christian, the posture which they are to observe in fight with their enemy; he comes now to instance in the several pieces of that armour, which before he had commended to them only in the general. The first of which is THE GIRDLE OF TRUTH--?having your loins girt about with truth.? A twofold inquiry is here requisite. --FIRST, What he means by truth. --SECOND, What by loins, and their being girt with truth.

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Direction Sixth

Excerpt: THE SEVERAL PIECES OF THE WHOLE ARMOUR OF GOD. Second Piece--The Christian?s Breastplate. ?And having on the breastplate of righteousness? (Eph. 6 :14).

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Direction Seventh the Several Pieces of the Whole Armour of God

Excerpt: This verse presents us with the third piece of armour in the Christian?s panoply--A SPIRITUAL SHOE, fitted to his foot, and to be worn by him, so long as he keeps the field against sin and Satan. ?And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace.? We shall cast the words into distinct questions or inquiries, from the resolution of which w ill result the several points to be insisted on. FIRST. What is meant by the ?gospel.? SECOND. What is meant by...

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Translations from the French of Madame de la Mothe Guion

By: William Cowper

Excerpt: Tis folly all--let me no more be told Of Parian porticos, and roofs of gold; Delightful views of nature, dressed by art, Enchant no longer this indifferent heart; The Lord of all things, in his humble birth, Makes mean the proud magnificence of earth; The straw, the manger, and the mouldering wall, Eclipse its lustre; and I scorn it all. Canals, and fountains, and delicious vales, Green slopes and plains, whose plenty never fails; Deep-rooted groves, whose heads...

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History of the Christian Church, Volume I : Apostolic Christianity...

By: Philip Schaff

Excerpt: As I appear before the public with a new edition of my Church History, I feel more than ever the difficulty and responsibility of a task which is well worthy to occupy the whole time and strength of a long life, and which carries in it its own rich reward. The true historian of Christianity is yet to come. But short as I have fallen of my own ideal, I have done my best, and shall rejoice if my efforts stimulate others to better and more enduring work. History sh...

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History of the Christian Church, Volume II : Ante-Nicene Christian...

By: Philip Schaff

Excerpt: A few months after the appearance of the revised edition of this volume, Dr. Bryennios, the learned Metropolitan of Nicomedia, surprised the world by the publication of the now famous Didache, which he had discovered in the Jerusalem Monastery of the Most Holy Sepulchre at Constantinople. This led me, in justice to myself and to my readers, to write an independent supplement under the title: The Oldest Church Manual, called the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, e...

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History of the Christian Church, Volume III : Nicene and Post-Nice...

By: Philip Schaff

Excerpt: This third volume covers the eventful period of Christian emperors, patriarchs, and ecumenical Councils, from Constantine the Great to Gregory the Great. It completes the History of Ancient Christianity, which is the common inheritance of Greek, Latin, and Evangelical Christendom. The first edition was published in 1867, and has not undergone any important changes. But in the revision of 1884 the more recent literature was added in an Appendix. In this edition t...

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History of the Christian Church, Volume IV : Mediaeval Christianit...

By: Philip Schaff

Excerpt: ? The mediaeval literature embraces four distinct branches, 1) The Romano-Germanic or Western Christian; 2) The Graeco-Byzantine or Eastern Christian; 3) The Talmudic and Rabbinical; 4) The Arabic and Mohammedan. We notice here only the first and second; the other two will be mentioned in subdivisions as far as they are connected with church history. The Christian literature consists partly of documentary sources, partly of historical works. We confine ourselves...

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History of the Christian Church, Volume V : The Middle Ages Ad 104...

By: Philip Schaff

Excerpt: Preface; It was the constant hope of Dr. Philip Schaff, the author of the History of the Christian Church, that he might live to finish the treatment of the Middle Ages, to which he had devoted one volume, covering the years 600-1050. He frequently said, during the last years of his life, If I am able to accomplish this, my History of the Christian Church will be measurably complete and I will be satisfied then to stop. He entered upon the task and had completed...

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