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Hall County, Georgia

 

Hall County, Georgia

Hall County, Georgia
Hall County courthouse in Gainesville

Location in the state of Georgia

Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded December 15, 1818
Named for Lyman Hall
Seat Gainesville
Largest city Gainesville
Area
 • Total 429 sq mi (1,111 km2)
 • Land 393 sq mi (1,018 km2)
 • Water 37 sq mi (96 km2), 8.5%
Population
 • (2010) 179,684
 • Density 457/sq mi (176/km²)
Congressional district 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website .org.hallcountywww

Hall County is a Gainesville.[2]

Hall County comprises the Gainesville, GA Sandy Springs, GA Combined Statistical Area.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Major highways 2.1
    • Adjacent counties 2.2
    • Attractions 2.3
  • Demographics 3
  • Education 4
    • Colleges and universities 4.1
    • High schools 4.2
    • Middle schools 4.3
  • Communities 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

Hall County was created on December 15, 1818, from Cherokee lands ceded by the Treaty of Cherokee Agency (1817) and Treaty of Washington (1819).

The county is named for colony and state.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 429 square miles (1,110 km2), of which 393 square miles (1,020 km2) is land and 37 square miles (96 km2) (8.5%) is water.[4] Hall is in the Chattahoochee River basin and the Oconee River basin.

The Chattahoochee River gathers strength in Hall County, as immortalized in Sidney Lanier's poem, "Song of the Chattahoochee":

OUT of the hills of Habersham,
Down the valleys of Hall,
I hurry amain to reach the plain,
Run the rapid and leap the fall,
Split at the rock and together again,

Major highways

  • Interstate 985
  • U.S. Route 23
  • U.S. Route 129
  • State Route 11
  • State Route 11 Business
  • State Route 13
  • State Route 51
  • State Route 52
  • State Route 53
  • State Route 53 Connector
  • State Route 60
  • State Route 82
  • State Route 115
  • State Route 136
  • State Route 211
  • State Route 254
  • State Route 283
  • State Route 284
  • State Route 323
  • State Route 332
  • State Route 347
  • State Route 365
  • State Route 369
  • State Route 419 (unsigned designation for I-985)

Adjacent counties

  • White County – north
  • Habersham County – northeast
  • Banks County – east
  • Jackson County – southeast
  • Barrow County – south
  • Gwinnett County – southwest
  • Forsyth County – west
  • Dawson County – northwest
  • Lumpkin County – northwest

Attractions

Demographics

Hall County remains extremely rural and many of its residents reside in unincorporated areas, accounting for more than half of the county's population. At the 2000 census,[10] 139,277 people, 80,381 households and 80,009 families resided in the county. The population density was 354 per square mile (137/km²). There were 51,046 housing units at an average density of 130 per square mile (50/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 80.75% White, 7.27% Black or African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.35% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 8.75% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. About 19.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 80,381 households, 37.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.20% were married couples living together, 10.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.00% were not families. About 19.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.26.

Age distribution was 26.90% under the age of 18, 10.80% from 18 to 24, 32.30% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 9.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.90 males.

The median household income was $44,908, and the median family income was $50,100. Males had a median income of $31,769 versus $24,550 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,690. About 8.50% of families and 12.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.20% of those under age 18 and 14.70% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Colleges and universities

High schools

Middle schools

  • Alternative Learning Center/International Center
  • C. W. Davis Middle School
  • Chestatee Middle School
  • Da Vinci Academy
  • East Hall Middle School
  • Gainesville Middle School
  • Lanier Career Academy
  • North Georgia Christian School
  • North Hall Middle School
  • South Hall Middle School
  • West Hall Middle School

Communities

  • Alto
  • Braselton (partly in Jackson, Barrow, and Gwinnett Counties)
  • Chestnut Mountain
  • Clermont
  • Flowery Branch
  • Gainesville
  • Gillsville
  • Lula
  • Oakwood
  • Murrayville (partly in Lumpkin and White Counties)

See also

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Hall County, Georgia

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^

External links

  • Economic Development in Hall County, Georgia
  • Business Gainesville-Hall County Chamber of Commerce
  • Lake Lanier Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • Hall County web site from Roadside Georgia
  • Hall County Government official site
  • GaGEN Web Hall County section
  • , Ed Jackson and Charly Pou, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of GeorgiaThis Day in Georgia History: December 15
  • Documents from Hall County at the Digital Library of Georgia

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