3-methyl-4,5-methylenedioxyamphetamine

5-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (5-Methyl-MDA) is an entactogen and psychedelic drug of the amphetamine class. It is a ring-methylated derivative of MDA and a structural isomer of MDMA.[1] Drug discrimination studies showed that 5-methyl-MDA substitutes for MDA, MMAI, and LSD, but not amphetamine, suggesting that it produces a mix of entactogen and hallucinogenic effects without any stimulant effects.[2]

5-Methyl-MDA acts as a selective serotonin releasing agent (SSRA) with IC50 values of 107nM, 11,600nM, and 1,494nM for serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine efflux.[1] It is over 5x more potent than MDA, with a suitable active dose possibly being around 15–25 mg.[1][2] Subsequent testing, however, has found that it is not as potent as once thought and is active at at least 100mg. 2-Methyl-MDA is also much more potent than MDA, but is not quite as potent as 5-methyl-MDA.[1] Both 6-methyl-MDA and 6-methyl-MDMA (also known as Madam-6) are inactive, likely due to steric hindrance.[1][3]

Recent research has used data on 2-methyl-MDA and 5-methyl-MDA to help guide computer modeling of the serotonin transporter complex.[4]

The synthesis of 5-methyl-MDA can be found online.[2]

See also

References

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