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Brant Brown

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Brant Brown

Brant Brown
Outfielder
Born: (1971-06-22) June 22, 1971
Porterville, California
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 15, 1996, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
August 29, 2000, for the Chicago Cubs
MLB statistics
Batting average .247
Home runs 45
Runs batted in 146
Teams

Brant Michael Brown (born June 22, 1971) is an American professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball from 1996 through 2000 for the Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Florida Marlins, and Chicago Cubs. He also played college baseball for the Fresno State Bulldogs. Brown served as a hitting coach in Minor League Baseball, and is currently the minor league outfield and baserunning coordinator for the Seattle Mariners.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
  • Coaching career 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Playing career

Brown attended Monache High School in Porterville, California, and California State University, Fresno, where he played college baseball for the Fresno State Bulldogs baseball team.

The Chicago Cubs selected Brown in the third round, with the 81st overall selection, in the 1992 MLB Draft. In his first season, he had a .274 batting average for the Peoria Chiefs of the Class A Midwest League. The next year, he hit .342 with the Daytona Cubs of the Class A-Advanced Florida State League and the Orlando Cubs of the Class AA Southern League. On June 15, 1996, Brown made his major league debut. Brown hit .304 in 69 at-bats that season.[1]

On June 18, 1998, Brown hit three home runs.[2] On September 23, 1998, the Cubs were in a tie with the New York Mets for the National League wild card with three games remaining. In a game against the Milwaukee Brewers that day, Chicago held a 7–5 lead in the bottom of the 9th inning, but Milwaukee loaded the bases with two out for Geoff Jenkins, who hit a long fly ball to Brown. Brown dropped the ball, which got past him, allowing three runs to score and giving the Brewers an 8–7 win. The Cubs faced the San Francisco Giants in a one-game playoff to break the tie for the Wild Card, which the Cubs won.[3] He hit .291 with 14 home runs and 48 runs batted in (RBIs) on the 1998 season.[4]

After the 1998 season, the Cubs traded Brown to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Jon Lieber.[4] Though primarily a left fielder, the Pirates had Brown open the season as their starting center fielder. Due to his struggles with the change, the Pirates replaced Brown in their starting lineup with José Guillén in May.[5] Brown hit .232 with 16 home runs and 58 RBIs with 114 strikeouts in 341 at bats for the Pirates in 1999. After the 1999 season, the Pirates traded Brown to the Florida Marlins for Bruce Aven.[6] On June 9, 2000, Brown was involved in a three-team trade, in which he was sent to the Cubs, while Dave Martinez went to the Texas Rangers and the Marlins received Chuck Smith.[7] In August, the Cubs sent Brown to the Iowa Cubs of the Class AAA Pacific Coast League (PCL), replacing him with Ross Gload.[8] Granted free agency after the 2000 season, Brown signed with the Brewers for the 2001 season. He played in the minor leagues for the Indianapolis Indians of the Class AAA International League[9] and the Memphis Redbirds of the PCL, the Class AAA affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals.[10]

Brown played for the Schaumburg Flyers of the Northern League, an independent baseball league, in 2003.[11]

Coaching career

After he retired as a player, Brown became a minor league Bakersfield Blaze of the Class A-Advanced California League.[12] In 2009, he joined the Frisco RoughRiders of the Class AA Texas League.[13] After three seasons with Frisco, he spent the 2012 season with the Round Rock Express of the PCL. After the 2012 season, the Seattle Mariners hired Brown as their minor league outfield and baserunning coordinator.[14]

References

  1. ^ "Brant Brown Minor League Statistics & History - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  2. ^ "The Free Lance-Star – Google News Archive Search". google.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Flashback #39: Brant Brown Game (1998)". cbslocal.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Observer-Reporter – Google News Archive Search". google.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Observer-Reporter – Google News Archive Search". google.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Boca Raton News – Google News Archive Search". google.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  7. ^ "The Daily Reporter – Google News Archive Search". google.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Sun Journal – Google News Archive Search". google.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  9. ^ "2001 Indianapolis Indians". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  10. ^ "2001 Memphis Redbirds". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  11. ^ "2003 Schaumburg Flyers". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Rangers announce 2008 Minor League staff". mlb.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  13. ^ "RoughRiders announce 2009 coaching staff". milb.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Woodward, Brown join Mariners' farm system". Seattle Mariners. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • Baseballlibrary.com
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