World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Coventry-Eagle

Article Id: WHEBN0017566048
Reproduction Date:

Title: Coventry-Eagle  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Villiers Engineering, Birmingham Small Arms Company, List of motorcycles in the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu, Francis-Barnett, Levis (motorcycle)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Coventry-Eagle

Coventry-Eagle
Industry manufacturing and engineering
Fate Closed by World War II
Successor Falcon Cycles
Founded 1903
Defunct 1939
Headquarters Coventry, England
Products Motorcycles and bicycles
Coventry-Eagle

Coventry-Eagle was a British bicycle and motorcycle manufacturer. Established as a Victorian bicycle maker, the company began under the name of Hotchkiss, Mayo & Meek. The company name was changed to Coventry Eagle in 1897 when John Meek left the company .[1] By 1898 they had begun to experiment with motorised vehicles and by 1899, had produced their first motorcycle. The motorcycles were hand built from components and finished carefully, Coventry-Eagle motorcycles proved reliable and by the First World War the range included Villiers Engineering and JAP engines.[2]

During the early 1920s, the models changed depending on what engines were available and the company swapped between five engine manufacturers - Villiers, JAP, Sturmey-Archer, Blackburne and Matchless.[3] The model Flying 8 was probably the most iconic bike of its time and bore a resemblance to the contemporary Brough Superior. During the depression of the 1930s, the company concentrated on producing two-strokes. Production continued until the start of the Second World War in 1939.[4]

In the 1930s they had launched a range of sporting bikes under the "Falcon" brand. After the war, and not of a scale to continue competitive motorcycle manufacture, the company concentrated on their racing bicycles. It was under this marque that the company relaunched itself as Falcon Cycles, now a division of Tandem Group.

Models

Model Year Comments
269 cc 1913 Villiers-powered two-speed
3.5 hp 1913 Single
5 hp 1914 Three-speed V-twin
500 cc single 1921
680 cc V-Twin 1921 JAP engine
Flying 8 1923
8 hp Super Sports Twin 1923
Flying 6 1927 674 cc side-valve twin
150 cc 1935 Coventry Eagle twin-port two-stroke and with a left-hand gear change and Albion gearbox
L5 249 cc 35 Silent Superb De Luxe 1935 Villiers engine and a 4-speed albion gearbox
N35 1937 Flying 350
N11 250 cc 1937 Pullman

References

  1. ^ [1], Classic Motor History.
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^

External links

  • Coventry-Eagle gallery
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.