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FIDE World Chess Championship 2005

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Title: FIDE World Chess Championship 2005  
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Subject: World Chess Championship 2006, FIDE World Chess Championship 2004, Development of the World Chess Championship, World Chess Championship, Vladimir Kramnik
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FIDE World Chess Championship 2005

The FIDE World Chess Championship 2005 took place in Potrero de los Funes, San Luis Province in Argentina from September 27 to October 16, 2005. It was won by Veselin Topalov.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Results 2
  • Aftermath 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

Background

In the face of criticism of the knockout FIDE World Chess Championships held from 1998 to 2004, FIDE (the World Chess Federation) made changes for its World Chess Championship in 2005. It used normal (slow) time controls (unlike the 2002 and 2004 knockout tournaments), and changed the format to an eight-player, double round-robin event, where every player plays every other player twice, once with each colour.

The players invited were:

The opening ceremony took place on September 27, the matches started on September 28, and the closing ceremony took place on October 16.

Results

FIDE World Chess Championship 2005
Rating Performance 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total
1  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 2788 (+102) - ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 10
2  Viswanathan Anand (India) 2788 (+19) ½ ½ - ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 1
3  Peter Svidler (Russia) 2738 (+76) 0 ½ ½ ½ - 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½
4  Alexander Morozevich (Russia) 2707 (+36) 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 - ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 7
5  Peter Leko (Hungary) 2763 (-52) 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 - ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½
6  Rustam Kasimdzhanov (Uzbekistan) 2670 (+2) 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 - ½ ½ 0 1
7  Michael Adams (England) 2719 (-53) 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ - ½ ½
8  Judit Polgár (Hungary) 2735 (-125) 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ -

The first tie-break was head-to-head result; the second tie-break was total number of wins.

Topalov scored an extraordinary 6½/7 in the first cycle, one of the greatest streaks in the history of championship-level chess. He then drew every one of his games in the second cycle, clinching the victory with one round to spare. This made Topalov the FIDE World Chess Champion.

Aftermath

FIDE declared before the tournament that they would regard whoever won as World Chess Champion. However, the non-participation of "Classical" World Champion Vladimir Kramnik meant that there were still two competing claimants to World Champion: FIDE Champion Topalov, and "Classical" Champion Kramnik.

Kramnik announced before the tournament that he should not be required to compete; but that as part of the "Prague Agreement",[2] his defense of his title in the Classical World Chess Championship 2004 entitled him to direct entry to a match against the FIDE World Champion for the unified world title.[3] After the tournament, he expressed his willingness to play such a match against Topalov.[4]

Although Topalov initially declined Kramnik's offer,[5] he later acceded.[6] The two contested the FIDE World Chess Championship 2006 to reunify the title, with Kramnik emerging the winner.

References

  1. ^ The Week in Chess 546
  2. ^ Peace in our time - Prague Agreement, ChessBase, Peace in our time, June 5, 2002
  3. ^ Official Statement by Vladimir Kramnik, The Week in Chess, April 28, 2005
  4. ^ Kramnik willing to face Topalov, ChessBase, October 22, 2005
  5. ^ Topalov says Nyet to Kramnik, ChessBase, October 22, 2005
  6. ^ FIDE press release on reunification

Further reading

  • Gershon, Alik; Nor, Igor (2006). San Luis 2005: How Chess Found Its Champion. Quality Chess Europe AB.  

External links

  • All games from Chessgames.com
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