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Nigerian Ministry of Women Affairs

 

Nigerian Ministry of Women Affairs

The Nigerian Ministry of Women Affairs is a ministry of the [1] The ministry is headed by a Minister appointed by the President, assisted by a Permanent Secretary, who is a career civil servant. The women Affairs ministry is also for the youth who are been force to go into prostitution. We have to stop them

Activities

Some activities undertaken by the Ministry include cottage industry projects such as bee-keeping, pottery and vegetable oil production to boost the economic empowerment of women, where the Ministry provides equipment and training to women's cooperatives. The Ministry also promotes literacy and health programs for women.[1] In December 2007, the ministry issued a policy that for addressing HIV/AIDS in the workplace, helping ensure prevention, care and support for those living with the disease.[2]

Leadership

The ministry was headed by Maryam Ciroma during President Olusegun Obasanjo's administration. She was succeeded by Saudatu Usman Bungudu as Minister of Women Affairs when President Yar'Adua announced his cabinet in July 2007. Saudatu Usman Bungudu was dropped on October 29, 2008 in a cabinet reshuffle.[3] Salamatu Hussaini Suleiman was sworn in as minister of Women Affairs on December 17, 2008.[4] As of December 2009, the Permanent Secretary was Dr D B Ibe.[5] After he assumed office, President Goodluck Jonathan appointed Iyom Josephine Anenih as the Minister of Women Affairs. She was sworn in on 6 April 2010.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Nenadi E. Usman. "Integration of gender perspectives in macroeconomics".  
  2. ^ "Nigerian Women's Ministry Develops HIV/AIDS Workplace Policy". The Body. December 19, 2007. Retrieved 2009-12-27. 
  3. ^ Tobs Agbaegbu (4 November 2008). "Sacking of 20 Ministers". Newswatch. Retrieved 2009-12-27. 
  4. ^ Anza Philips, Abuja Bureau (24 December 2008). "The Coming of New Helmsmen". Newswatch. Retrieved 2009-12-27. 
  5. ^ "Permanent Secretaries". Office of the Head of Service of the Federation. Retrieved 2009-12-27. 
  6. ^ Maureen Chigbo (11 April 2010). "New Ministers, Tough Challenges". Newswatch. Retrieved 2010-09-19. 
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