World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Women in Mauritius

Article Id: WHEBN0016089996
Reproduction Date:

Title: Women in Mauritius  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Women in Africa, Women in medicine, Women in the workforce, Women and agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa, Women in Chad
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Women in Mauritius

Women in Mauritius
Two female Sega music dancers (center and right) from Mauritius.
Gender Inequality Index
Value 0.353 (2011)
Rank 63rd
Maternal mortality (per 100,000) 36 (2008)
Women in parliament 18.8% (2011)
Females over 25 with secondary education 45.2% (2010)
Women in labour force 40.8% (2009)
Global Gender Gap Index[1]
Value 0.6599 (2013)
Rank 98th out of 136

As in other industrializing countries, the role of women in Mauritius is changing rapidly. A major force for change has been the rapid influx of women into the many jobs created in the 1980s in the export processing zones. Although low-paying for the most part, the jobs allow women formerly confined to the roles of mother and wife to gain a certain degree of personal and social freedom. One woman, in a 1993 National Geographic article, said: "For a Mauritian woman, to work is to be free. Before, a girl could not leave home until her parents found a husband for her, and then she moved into her husband's family's home and spent the rest of her life having babies. I met my husband at work, and it was my decision to marry him. Now we live in our own house."

The government has taken measures to promote equality of the sexes by repealing discriminatory laws dealing with inheritance and emigration. In 1989 the government appointed equal opportunity officers in the principal ministries to deal with women's issues. Reports by the Ministry of Women's Rights and Family Welfare and others indicate, however, that violence against women is prevalent. The increased employment of women has created the need for more child-care services and for more laborsaving devices in the home.

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Library of Congress Country Studies. (Data as of 1994.)

  1. ^

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.