World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

1956 In Aviation

Article Id: WHEBN0000566575
Reproduction Date:

Title: 1956 In Aviation  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Aviation/Anniversaries/September 10, Aviation/Anniversaries/March 10, Aviation/Anniversaries/October 1, 1959 in aviation, 1958 in aviation
Collection: 1956 in Aviation, Years in Aviation
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

1956 In Aviation

Years in aviation: 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s
Years: 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1956:

Contents

  • Events 1
    • January 1.1
    • February 1.2
    • March 1.3
    • April 1.4
    • May 1.5
    • June 1.6
    • July 1.7
    • August 1.8
    • September 1.9
    • October 1.10
    • November 1.11
    • December 1.12
  • First flights 2
    • March 2.1
    • April 2.2
    • May 2.3
    • June 2.4
    • July 2.5
    • August 2.6
    • September 2.7
    • October 2.8
    • November 2.9
    • December 2.10
  • Entered service 3
    • February 3.1
    • March 3.2
    • April 3.3
    • July 3.4
    • September 3.5
    • December 3.6
  • References 4

Events

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

  • November 1 – During the day, British Fleet Air Arm de Havilland Sea Venoms, Chance Vought Corsairs, and Hawker Sea Hawks from the aircraft carriers HMS Eagle, HMS Albion, and HMS Bulwark conduct a series of daylight strikes against Egyptian airbases, destroying over 200 aircraft – mostly on the ground – by nightfall and knocking the Egyptian Air Force out of action. It begins the first large-scale action by the Fleet Air Arm since the end of World War II in 1945.[17][18] The Egyptian President Abdel Nasser orders Egyptian pilots to fly all surviving aircraft to southern Egypt and avoid further action against British, French, and Israeli forces.
  • November 2 – After aerial reconnaissance reveals the destruction of the Egyptian Air Force, the British invasion force commander, General Sir Charles Keightley, orders British and French aircraft to begin a wide-ranging interdiction campaign against Egypt‍ '​s military bases, infrastructure, and economy.[17]
  • November 3
  • November 4 – Israeli Air Force aircraft make a large strike against Egyptian positions at Sharm el-Sheikh, after which two Israeli Army brigades occupy the area.[19]
  • November 5 – The British and French bombing campaign against Egypt ends, with fixed-wing aircraft from the three British aircraft carriers alone having flown 1,300 sorties.[20] Late in the day, the first British forces come ashore in Egypt as elements of the 3rd Battalion of the British Parachute Regiment land by parachute at El Gamil airfield and are reinforced by additional elements brought in by helicopter from the British aircraft carriers HMS Ocean and HMS Theseus.
  • November 6 – The world‍ '​s first ship-based helicopter-borne assault takes place, as helicopters from HMS Ocean and HMS Theseus land 425 men of the Royal Marines‍ '​ 45 Commando and 23 tons of stores in Port Said, Egypt, in 90 minutes. During the day, over 1,000 French paratroopers jump into Egypt, and French Corsairs and F-84F Thunderstreaks provide close air support to French forces. A ceasefire ends hositilities between Egypt and the United Kingdom, France, and Israel in the evening, with the Israeli Air Force having flown 489 missions, mostly against ground targets, over the Sinai Peninsula. The last major operation by a British aircraft carrier force in history comes to an end.[21][22]
  • November 7 – The Norwegian airline Braathens SAFE has its first fatal accident when a de Havilland DH.114 Heron 2B crashes into the mountain Hummelfjell in Tolga, Norway, killing two of the 12 people on board. Among the survivors is Norwegian journalist and radio and television personality Rolf Kirkvaag, who suffers a broken foot; along with another passenger, he walks 18 km (11 miles) from the crash site to find help the following day.
  • November 24 – A Douglas DC-6 of Linee Aeree Italiane en route to New York crashes at takeoff near Paris-Le Bourget Airport airport, killing the crew of 10 and 25 passengers. Among the victims the world-famous orchestra director Guido Cantelli.
  • November 28 – The Ryan X-13 Vertijet makes its first transition from vertical to horizontal flight
  • November 30 – The jet-propelled Martin MGM-1 Matador completes flight testing to become the U.S. Air Force‍ '​s first operational surface-to-surface cruise missile.[11]

December

First flights

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

  • October 22 – Bell XH-40 (Bell Model 204), prototype of the UH-1 Iroquois[31]

November

December

Entered service

February

March

April

July

September

December

References

  1. ^ Japanese P2V-7s
  2. ^ Polmar, Norman, "Historic Aircraft: The Flying Banana," Naval History, August 2010, p. 17.
  3. ^ aerobaticteams.net Sky Lancers
  4. ^ 1 Air Division Aerobatic Display Teams Sky Lancers – 1956
  5. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, pp. 282, 283.
  6. ^ a b Polmar, Norman, "A Limited Success," Naval History, August 2015, p. 64.
  7. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 451.
  8. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 615.
  9. ^ Official U.S. Navy Web site for Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron One (VQ-1): History: A New Navy Squadron
  10. ^ a b Chronology of Significant Events in Naval Aviation: "Naval Air Transport" 1941 -- 1999
  11. ^ a b c d , Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, 2003, no ISBN number, p. 79.One Hundred Years of Flight: USAF Chronology of Significant Air and Space Events, 1903-2002Haulman, Daniel L.,
  12. ^ globalsecurity.org Convair XP5Y-1/R3Y Tradewind flying boat
  13. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 116.
  14. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Aircraft Accident Douglas R6D-1 (DC-6) 131588 Land's End, UK
  15. ^ a b Cordesman, Anthony H., and Abraham R. Wagner, The Lessons of Modern War, Volume I: The Arab-Israeli Conflicts, 1973-1989, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1990, ISBN 0-8133-1329-5, p. 15.
  16. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, pp. 95-96.
  17. ^ a b Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 189.
  18. ^ Cordesman, Anthony H., and Abraham R. Wagner, The Lessons of Modern War, Volume I: The Arab-Israeli Conflicts, 1973-1989, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1990, ISBN 0-8133-1329-5, pp. 15-16.
  19. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 103.
  20. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 190.
  21. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, pp. 190, 215.
  22. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 126.
  23. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World‍ '​s Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1978, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 66.
  24. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-295-8, p. 197.
  25. ^ WorldHeritage HMS Vengeance (R71) article).
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Bridgman 1956, p. 38.
  27. ^ Swanborough, Gordon, and Peter M. Bowers, United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, London: Putnam, 1976, ISBN 0-370-10054-9, p. 470.
  28. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, pp. 190-191.
  29. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 47.
  30. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 356.
  31. ^ David, Donald, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Nobles Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 109.
  32. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 107.
  33. ^ Polmar, Norman, "Historic Aircraft: Great But Impractical Aircraft," Naval History, June 2012, p. 13.
  34. ^ http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/r3y.htm globalsecurity.org Convair XP5Y-1/R3Y Tradewind flying boat
  35. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 275.
  36. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 190.
  37. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World‍ '​s Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1978, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 57.
  • Bridgman, Leonard. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1956–57, New York: The McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1956.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.