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1974 Brussels summit

Brussels summit
Map of NATO members
Host country Belgium
Dates June 26, 1974

The 1974 Brussels summit was the second NATO summit bringing the leaders of member nations together at the same time. The formal sessions and informal meetings in Brussels, Belgium took place on June 26, 1974.[1] This twenty-fifth anniversary event was only the third meeting of the NATO heads of state following the ceremonial signing of the North Atlantic Treaty on April 4, 1949.[2]

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Agenda 2
  • Accomplishments 3
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Background

The organization faced a generational challenge; and the unresolved questions concerned whether a new generation of leaders would be as committed to NATO as their predecessors had been.[2] The results of 1974 elections would change a significant number of officials at the top of allied governments—in the Britain, Giscard d'Estaing; and in West Germany, Chancellor Willy Brandt was replaced by Helmut Schmidt.[3] The 1974 resignation of President Richard Nixon caused Gerald Ford to become the new head of the American government.[4]

Agenda

The general discussions focused on the need to confirm the dedication of member countries of the Alliance to the aims and ideals of the Treaty in the 25th anniversary of its signature. In addition, there were informal consultations on East-West relations in preparation for US-USSR summit talks on strategic nuclear arms limitations.[1]

Accomplishments

NATO leaders signed of the Declaration on Atlantic Relations which had been adopted by NATO foreign ministers in meeting in Ottawa a week earlier.[1]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c NATO. "NATO summit meetings". Archived from the original on 2009-05-04. Retrieved 2009-03-18. 
  2. ^ a b Thomas, Ian Q.R. (1997). p. 101.The promise of alliance: NATO and the political imagination,
  3. ^ Thomas, p. 107.
  4. ^ Thomas, p. 108.

References

  • Thomas, Ian Q.R. (1997). The promise of alliance: NATO and the political imagination. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. 10-ISBN 0-8476-8581-0; 13-ISBN 978-0-8476-8581-3; OCLC 36746439

External links

  • NATO update, 1974
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