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3-Fluoromethcathinone

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Title: 3-Fluoromethcathinone  
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Language: English
Subject: 3-Fluoroethamphetamine, Flephedrone, 3-Methylamphetamine, 3-Methoxymethamphetamine, Amfepentorex
Collection: Cathinones, Designer Drugs, Fluoroarenes, Norepinephrine-Dopamine Releasing Agents, Organofluorides
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3-Fluoromethcathinone

3-Fluoromethcathinone
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(RS)-1-(3-Fluorophenyl)-2-methylaminopropan-1-one
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Routes Oral, Intranasal, Intravenous
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code ?
Chemical data
Formula C10H12FNO 
Mol. mass 181.206
 YesY   

3-Fluoromethcathinone, also known as 3-FMC, is a member of the phenethylamine, amphetamine and cathinone chemical classes. It is a stimulant drug which is reported to be contained in some legal highs.[1] 3-Fluoroisomethcathinone is produced as a by-product when 3-FMC is synthesised, the activity of this compound is unknown.[2]

Contents

  • Effects 1
  • Legal status 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Effects

This chemical's psychoactive effects are yet to be studied scientifically, however it is suspected to be much like mephedrone, though it is also suspected to lack entactogenic quality.[2]

Legal status

  • United States: 3-Fluoromethcathinone is unscheduled in the United States.[3] However, on January 28, 2014, the DEA listed it, along with 9 other synthetic cathinones, on the Schedule 1 with a temporary ban, effective February 27, 2014.[4]
  • United Kingdom: 3-Fluoromethcathinone is now a controlled drug (2010).

See also

References

  1. ^ "Fluoromethcathinone, a new substance of abuse.". Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (1-3): 10–20. March 2009.  
  2. ^ a b Two cases of confirmed ingestion of the novel designer compounds: 4-methylmethcathinone (Mephedrone) and 3-fluoromethcathinone Susannah Davies et al.
  3. ^ United States Drug Enforcement Agency Drug Scheduling. Accessed 23:50 GMT 11 January 2010
  4. ^ http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/fed_regs/rules/2014/fr0128.htm


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