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4-HO-MiPT

 

4-HO-MiPT

4-HO-MiPT
Systematic (IUPAC) name
3-(2-[Isopropyl(methyl)amino]ethyl)-1H-indol-4-ol
Clinical data
Legal status
  • UK: NotScheduled
  • US: NotScheduled
  • See Legality
Routes of
administration
Oral, intranasal, rectal, IV, IM
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  N
ATC code None
PubChem CID:
ChemSpider  YesY
ChEMBL  YesY
Synonyms 4-hydroxy-N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine
Chemical data
Formula C14H20N2O
Molecular mass
Documentation

Physical data
Melting point 123 to 125 °C (253 to 257 °F)
 N   

4-HO-MiPT (miprocin, 4-hydroxy-N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine, hats) is a synthetic substituted aromatic compound and a lesser-known psychedelic tryptamine. It is thought to be a serotonergic psychedelic, similar to magic mushrooms, LSD and mescaline. Its molecular structure and pharmacological effects resemble those of the tryptamine psilocin, which is the primary psychoactive chemical in magic mushrooms.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Chemistry 2
  • Pharmacology 3
  • Toxicity 4
  • Dosage 5
  • Duration 6
  • Drug prohibition laws 7
    • Sweden 7.1
    • UK 7.2
    • USA 7.3
  • See also 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

History

4-HO-MiPT was presumably first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. Its synthesis is described in his book TiHKAL along with reports by people who had ingested the compound. Shulgin's trials and other anecdotal information suggest that 4-HO-MiPT is a synthetic psychedelic similar in activity to psilocin. It is relatively uncommon and has only a short history of human use.

Chemistry

Miprocin is the 4-hydroxyl analog of the chemical N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine as well as the isopropyl homolog and possible structural analog of 4-HO-DMT.

Pharmacology

4-HO-MiPT is thought to be a serotonergic psychedelic. Like other serotonergic psychedelics, its method of action is believed to result from its partial agonism of 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A serotonin receptors.

Toxicity

Very little is known about the toxicity of 4-HO-MiPT. Its chemical structure and pharmacological activity are very similar to psilocin, a compound which isn't associated with compulsive use or physical dependence. However, because very little research has been done on 4-HO-MiPT, it cannot be definitively concluded that its pharmacological actions in the human body do not differ from those of psilocin. To date, there have been no reported deaths from 4-HO-MiPT.

Dosage

Miprocin (Fumarate) Intravenous Dose
Threshold 1 mg-2 mg
Light 3 mg-5 mg
Common 6 mg-9 mg
Strong 10 mg-14 mg
Heavy 15 mg+
Onset After Effects
3-10 seconds 30 minutes to three hours

Duration

The duration is one half hour to two hours when injected IV.

Drug prohibition laws

Sweden

Sveriges riksdags health ministry Statens folkhälsoinstitut classified 4-HO-MiPT as "health hazard" under the act Lagen om förbud mot vissa hälsofarliga varor (translated Act on the Prohibition of Certain Goods Dangerous to Health) as of Nov 1, 2005, in regulation SFS 2005:733 listed as "4-hydroxi-N,N-metylisopropyltryptamin (4-HO-MIPT)", making it illegal to sell or possess.[1]

UK

The substance could also be considered illegal in the UK under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.

USA

4-HO-MiPT is an unscheduled drug in the United States. However, it is an analog of psilocin, which could lead to prosecution under the Federal Analog Act.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.notisum.se/rnp/sls/sfs/20050733.pdf

External links

  • Erowid 4-HO-MiPT Vault
  • 4-HO-MIPT entry in TiHKAL
  • 4-HO-MIPT entry in TiHKAL • info


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