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5f-adb

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Title: 5f-adb  
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Subject: ADAMANTYL-THPINACA, AB-CHFUPYCA, CP 55,244, JWH-030, JWH-081
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5f-adb

5F-ADB
Names
Systematic IUPAC name
Methyl (S)-2-[1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamido]-3,3-dimethylbutanoate
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
C20H28FN3O3
Molar mass 377.46 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

5F-ADB (also known as 5F-MDMB-PINACA) is an indazole-based synthetic cannabinoid from the indazole-3-carboxamide family, which has been used as an active ingredient in synthetic cannabis products.[1] It is believed to be a potent agonist of the CB1 receptor, though it is unclear whether it is selective for this target. 5F-ADB was first identified in November 2014 from post-mortem samples taken from an individual who had died after using a product containing this substance. Subsequent testing identified 5F-ADB to have been present in a total of ten people who had died from unexplained drug overdoses in Japan between September 2014 and December 2014, and it was added to the Japanese banned drug list in December 2014. 5F-ADB is believed to be extremely potent based on the very low levels detected in tissue samples, and appears to be significantly more toxic than earlier synthetic cannabinoid drugs that had previously been sold.[2]


See also

References

  1. ^ Shevyrin V, Melkozerov V, Nevero A, Eltsov O, Shafran Y, Morzherin Y, Lebedev AT (Apr 2015). "Identification and analytical characteristics of synthetic cannabinoids with an indazole-3-carboxamide structure bearing a N-1-methoxycarbonylalkyl group". Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.  
  2. ^ Hasegawa, Koutaro; Wurita, Amin; Minakata, Kayoko; Gonmori, Kunio; Yamagishi, Itaru; Nozawa, Hideki; Watanabe, Kanako; Suzuki, Osamu (2014). "Identification and quantitation of 5-fluoro-ADB, one of the most dangerous synthetic cannabinoids, in the stomach contents and solid tissues of a human cadaver and in some herbal products". Forensic Toxicology.  


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