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Aircraft maintenance

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Title: Aircraft maintenance  
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Aircraft maintenance

Aircraft maintenance
Field maintenance on a Cessna 172 being conducted from a van used to carry tools and parts
A Panavia Tornado undergoing maintenance

Aircraft maintenance is the overhaul, repair, inspection or modification of an aircraft or aircraft component.[1]

In Canada, maintenance includes the installation or removal of a component from an aircraft or aircraft subassembly, but does not include:[1]

  • Elementary work, such as removing and replacing tires, inspection plates, spark plugs, checking cylinder compression etc., on small privately operated aircraft ; or removal and replacement of fuses, light bulbs etc., on transport category aircraft .[2]
  • Servicing, such as refueling, washing windows.[1]
  • Any work done on an aircraft or aircraft component as part of the manufacturing process, prior to issue of a certificate of airworthiness or other certification document.[1]

Maintenance may include such tasks as ensuring compliance with Airworthiness Directives or Service Bulletins.[3]

Contents

  • Regulation 1
  • Airworthiness release 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Regulation

Aircraft maintenance is highly regulated. There are various airworthiness authorities around the world. The major airworthiness authorities include:

Airworthiness release

At the completion of any maintenance task a person authorized by the national airworthiness authority signs a release stating that maintenance has been performed in accordance with the applicable airworthiness requirements. In the case of a certified aircraft this may be an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer or Aircraft Maintenance Technician, while for amateur-built aircraft this may be the owner or builder of the aircraft.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d  
  2. ^  
  3. ^  
  4. ^  

External links

  • Canadian Aviation Maintenance Council
  • Association for Women in Aviation Maintenance
  • AMT Society
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