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Alulim

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Title: Alulim  
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Subject: Sumerian King List, Ilku, Etana, Enmebaragesi, Lugalbanda
Collection: Fertile Crescent, Sumerian Epic Heroes, Sumerian Rulers
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Alulim

Alulim was the first king of Eridu, and the first king of Sumer, according to the mythological antediluvian section of the Sumerian King List. Enki, the god of Eridu, is said to have brought civilization to Sumer at this point, or just shortly before.

The Sumerian King List has the following entry for Alulim:

"After the kingship descended from heaven, the kingship was in Eridug (Eridu). In Eridug, Alulim became king; he ruled for 28,800 years."[1][2]

In a chart of antediluvian generations in Babylonian and Biblical traditions, Professor William Wolfgang Hallo associates Alulim with the composite half-man, half-fish counselor or culture hero (Apkallu) Uanna-Adapa (Oannes), and suggests an equivalence between Alulim and Enosh in the Sethite genealogy given in Genesis chapter 5. Hallo notes that Alulim's name means "Stag".[3]

William H. Shea suggests that Alulim was a contemporary of the biblical figure Adam, who may have been derived from Adapa of ancient Mesopotamian religion.[4]

References

  1. ^ Jona Lendering (2006). "Sumerian King List". 
  2. ^ Wang, Haicheng (2004). Writing and the Ancient State: Early China in Comparative Perspective. Cambridge University Press. p. 36.  
  3. ^ Hallo, William W. and William Kelly Simpson, The Ancient Near East: A History, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., New York, 1971, p. 32
  4. ^ William H. Shea (1977). "Adam in Ancient Mesopotamian Traditions". 
Preceded by
new creation
1st King of Sumer
before c. 2900 BC, or legendary
Succeeded by
Alalngar
1st Ensi of Eridu
before c. 2900 BC, or legendary
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