Archbishop of Narbonne

The former Catholic diocese of Narbonne existed from early Christian times until the French Revolution. It was an archdiocese, with its see at Narbonne, from the year 445,[1] and its influence ran over much of south-western France and into Catalonia. Diminished by the creation of other dioceses in 1317, its territory was merged under the Concordat of 1801 into the diocese of Carcassonne. The title Archbishop of Narbonne, however, belongs to the Archbishop of Toulouse. An attempt after the Restoration to re-establish the see was defeated in the French parliament, with the result that a new metropolitan see was created for the Languedoc region at Montpellier in 2002.[2]

Bishops and archbishops

To 1000

  • Saint Paul I. (c. 251)
  • Saint Etienne (third century)
  • Gavidius (359)
  • Hilaire (417–422)
  • Rusticus (427, 461, c.441–445)
  • Hermes (462) (first archbishop 445)
  • Caprarpus (506)
  • Aquilin (560)
  • Athaloc (ca. 589)
  • Migetius (Migecio) (ca. 589–597)
  • Serge (c. 610)
  • Selva (Sclua) (ca. 633–638)
  • Argebaud (c. 672)
  • Sunifred (ca. 683–688)
  • Arriberi (ca. 768)
  • Daniel (ca. 769-ca. 798)
  • Nebridius (Nefridius) (ca. 790–822 or ca. 799-ca. 825)
  • Bartholomeus (ca. 827–840 oder ca. 822–844)
  • Berarius (ca. 842-ca. 850)
  • Fredoldus (ca. 855–872)
  • Sigebaud (873–885)
  • Theodard (Teodard) (885–893)
  • Arnust (893–912)
  • Gerard (911)
  • Agio (914–924)
  • Aimery (926–977)
  • Ermengaud (Ermengol) (977-1017/1019)

1000–1300

  • Guifred de Cerdagne[3] (6 October 1019 – 1079)
  • Pierre Berengar (1079–1085)
  • Dalmas (Dalmace) (c. 1086–1097)
  • Bertrand de Montredon (1097–1106)
  • Richard de Millau (Milhau) (1106–1121)
  • Arnaud de Lévezou (1121–1149) (also bishop of Béziers)
  • Pierre d'Anduze (1150–1156)
  • Berengar (1156–1162)
  • Pons D'Arce (1162–1181)
  • Bernard Gaucelin (1182–1191) (also bishop of Béziers)
  • Berengar of Barcelona (1191–1212); son of Raimund Berengar IV
  • Arnaldus Amalric (or Arnaud Amaury) (1212–1225)
  • Pierre (1226–1245)
  • Guillaume de Broue (1245–1257)
  • Jacques (1257–1259)
  • Guido Fulcodi (1259–1261)
  • Maurin (1262–1272)
  • Pierre de Montbrun (1272–1286)
  • Gilles I Aycelin de Montaigu (1287–1311)

From 1300

Notes

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