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Arroz con pollo

Arroz con pollo
Place of origin Spain and Puerto Rico
Region or state Spain, Latin America
Main ingredients rice, chicken, vegetables
Cookbook: Arroz con pollo 
Home-made Arroz con pollo and "Papa a la Huancaína", (bottom), Lima, Perú

Arroz con pollo (rice with chicken) is a traditional dish of Spain and Latin America, closely related to paella. In the Dominican Republic it is called locrio de pollo, and in Saint Martin it is called lokri or locreo.[1][2][3][4][5]

There is some debate as to whether it originated in Spain. Puerto Ricans consider it one of their classic recipes. Many Puerto Ricans note that arroz con pollo cannot be made without beer and annatto oil and saffron is no substitute. Beer and annatto are rarely used in Spanish cooking and never in arroz con pollo there. Annatto is frequently used in Puerto Rican cooking especially in rice dishes like arroz con gandules (rice with pork and pigeon peas) and arroz con maiz (rice with corn and sausage). Beer is used in many Puerto Rican dishes like pollo guisado (braised stewed chicken) and asopao de pollo (chicken rice stew). Arroz con pollo and most Puerto Rican rice dishes are highly seasoned with sofrito, which is another key ingredient in arroz con pollo.

Food writer Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz, pointing out the international aspects of the dish, notes the origin of Arroz con Pollo in the Spanish forms of pilaf, already reflecting international influences: chicken was brought from India and rice from Asia; saffron (used for the yellow colour in Spain, instead of annatto) was introduced by Phoenician traders; tomatoes and peppers (also known as sofrito) are natives of the Americas.[1][6]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b  
  2. ^ Alice L. McLean (30 August 2006). Cooking in America, 1840–1945. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 139.  
  3. ^ Robert M. Weir; Karen Hess (March 1998). The Carolina Rice Kitchen: The African Connection. Univ of South Carolina Press. p. 39.  
  4. ^ Kellie Jones; Amiri Baraka; Lisa Jones; Hettie Jones; Guthrie P. Ramsey (6 May 2011). EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art. Duke University Press. p. 285.  
  5. ^ D. H. Figueredo (16 July 2002). The complete idiot's guide to Latino history and culture. Penguin. p. 250.  
  6. ^ "Arroz con Pollo"/ Foodandwine.com. Accessed August 2011.

External links

  • Receta de Arroz con Pollo
  • Receta de Arroz Guisado con Pollo
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