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Batboy

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Title: Batboy  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ball boy, Baseball positions, Chase (dog), Shagging (baseball), A. Arthur Giddon
Collection: Baseball Occupations, Baseball Terminology
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Batboy

A Lansing Lugnuts batboy (in white) carrying a baseball bat away from home plate.

A batboy (or batgirl) in sports is an individual who carries the baseball bats around to a baseball team. A batboy may also lay out the equipment and mud the baseballs to be used in the game.

Mascots and batboys had both been part of baseball since the 1880s. Perhaps the most famous mascot/batboy was Eddie Bennett, who was supposedly hired as a mascot by the Chicago White Sox at the urging of Happy Felsch in 1919, a tale Eddie told often but no White Sox player ever corroborated. After the 1919 World Series scandal, he was hired by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1920. When the Dodgers lost the 1920 World Series to the Cleveland Indians, some suggested the four straight losses on the road were due to leaving Bennett behind. He then served for almost 12 years as mascot/batboy for the New York Yankees.

Contents

  • Uniforms 1
  • Batboys in the news 2
  • Batboys in popular culture 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Uniforms

Batboys typically wear the same uniform design as their associated team. They will also usually wear a batting helmet to protect them from flying balls or bats.

During any given major league game, both the home and visiting team batboys will be drawn from the city where the game is taking place (batboys typically do not travel on the road with their team, unless they are relatives of a player). Home batboys often have regular jobs with a team, and thus may wear their first names on their uniforms; visiting teams, on the other hand, usually do not know who will be serving as their batboys on the road, and thus will send uniforms of various sizes to accommodate batboys of varying heights and weights.

A batboy may be provided his own number, but will usually wear 00 or 'BB' in its place. If a batboy uniform does not have a first name on it, it will usually have the term 'BAT BOY' or no name at all.

Batboys in the news

  • On June 30, 2000, police discovered steroids and syringes in the glove compartment of the Mercedes-Benz that had been loaned to Boston Red Sox batboy Carlos Cowart by infielder Manny Alexander.
  • In the 2002 World Series, a bat boy (Darren Baker, the 3½ year old son of San Francisco Giants manager Dusty Baker) was involved in an incident when he went out to get a bat while the play was still going on. J.T. Snow grabbed the young boy at home plate while still in the middle of scoring his run for the Giants, saving him from a possible collision with runners behind him or players from the opposing team.[1] After the incident, MLB set a minimum age limit of 14 for bat boys.[2]
  • In a pregame ceremony on May 5, 2007, Stan Bronson, Jr. received recognition by the Guinness World Records as the "Most Durable Batboy" ever. Bronson, known as "Stan The Man", has served as the batboy for the University of Memphis baseball team since the 1958 season. His 50 years of service is recognized in the 2008 edition of the Guinness Book of World Records.
  • Dominick Ardovino wrote about his batboy experience with the New York Mets in The Bat Boy (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967).

Batboys in popular culture

The batboy, Bobby Savoy, is a supporting character in the 1984 film, The Natural. At the finale Bobby gives the main character, Roy Hobbs, a bat that he's made with Hobbs' help after Hobbs has broken his own personally made childhood bat.

Two Warner Brothers cartoons, Porky's Baseball Broadcast and Baseball Bugs), feature sight-gags involving batboys who fly in on bat wings to deliver bats.

See also

References

  1. ^ 2002 World Series incident, USA Today, 2002-10-24. Retrieved on 2009-07-11.
  2. ^ "BASEBALL; Selig to Raise Age For Batboys to 14". New York Times. 17 December 2002. Retrieved 27 October 2014. 
  3. ^ a b NBC Sports"Ex-Mets clubhouse worker admits dealing steroids to players"

External links

  • Morris, Peter Eddie Bennett via baseball biography project
  • Excerpt from Matthew McGough's book Bat Boy (Part 1)
  • Excerpt from Matthew McGough's book Bat Boy (Part 2)
  • Grossfeld, Stan (April 27, 2005). Batboy finds it tough to pick up his life. Boston Globe
  • ESPN (August 25, 2005). Suspended batboy mulling two offers.
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