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Battle of Adrianople (1205)

Battle of Adrianople
Part of Bulgarian-Latin Wars
Date April 14, 1205
Location Surroundings of Adrianople
Result Decisive Bulgarian victory and capture of the Latin Emperor Baldwin I
Belligerents
Second Bulgarian Empire and Cumans Latin Empire
Commanders and leaders
Tsar Kaloyan of Bulgaria Baldwin I of Constantinople
Strength
Around 40,000 bulgarian troops - infantry, cavalry and archers.
Around 14,000 Cuman light and missile cavalry.[1]
Unknown, probably several tens of thousands. Certain number - 300 West European heavy mounted knights, mainly from France.
Casualties and losses
Unknown, light. Several thousand soldiers and almost all of the knights.

The Battle of Adrianople occurred on April 14, 1205 between Bulgarians and Cumans under Tsar Kaloyan of Bulgaria, and Crusaders under Baldwin I, who only months before had been crowned Emperor of Constantinople. It was won by the Bulgarians, who took Baldwin prisoner.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • The Battle 2
  • Aftermath 3
  • Citations 4
  • References 5

Background

The armies of the Fourth Crusade deviated from their stated goal of Jerusalem and instead captured and sacked the Christian city of Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, in 1204. The Bulgarian kingdom and Byzantine remnants soon united against the newly founded Latin Empire.

The Battle

The battle was won by the Bulgarians after a skillful ambush using the help of their Cuman and Greek allies. Around 300 knights were killed, including Louis of Blois, Duke of Nicaea and Baldwin was captured and later died in captivity. The Bulgarians then overran much of Thrace and Macedonia. Baldwin was succeeded by his younger brother, Henry of Flanders, who took the throne on August 20, 1206.

The main source document for this battle comes from the Chronicles of Geoffrey de Villehardouin.

Aftermath

Emperor Theodore Lascaris continued. In 1207 the Bulgarians attacked and killed Marquis Boniface of Montferrat at Messinopolis. He was beheaded and the head was sent to Kaloyan.

Citations

  1. ^ Phillips, Jonathan (2004) The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople, London: Jonathan Cape ISBN 0-224-06986-1; p. 289.

References

  • DeVries, Kelly. Battles of the Crusades 1097-1444: From Dorylaeum to Varna. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007. ISBN 0760793344
  • , I. Освобождение и обединение на българските земи, 5. Отношенията на Калоян към латинци и ромеиИстория на българската държава през средните векове. Том III. Второ българско царство. България при Асеневци (1187—1280) by Васил Н. Златарски
  • История на България. Том ІІІ. Втора българска държава, издателство на БАН, София, 1982
  • Българските ханове и царе VІІ-ХІV век. Историко-хронологичен справочник, Държавно издателство Петър Берон, София, 1988, Йордан Андреев

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