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Battle of Tara (Ireland)

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Title: Battle of Tara (Ireland)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Scandinavian Scotland, Rulers of the Kingdom of the Isles, Glúniairn, Uí Ímair, INMED
Collection: 10Th Century in Ireland, 980 in Europe, 980S Conflicts, Battles Involving the Uí Néill, Uí Ímair
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Battle of Tara (Ireland)

Battle of Tara
Date 980
Location Near the Hill of Tara, Meath
Result Decisive Uí Néill victory
Belligerents
Southern Uí Néill Norse Kingdom of Dublin
Commanders and leaders
Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill Amlaíb Cuarán aka Óláf Sigtryggsson
Strength
? ?
Casualties and losses
Light Very heavy

The Battle of Tara was a battle between the Gaels and Norse that took place in Ireland in 980.

Contents

  • Description 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Bibliography 4
  • External links 5

Description

On one side there was a Norse army from the Kingdom of Dublin supported by troops from the Hebrides, which was commanded by a son of Olaf Cuaran named Ragnall.[1] The other side was led by Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, who had recently come to power as head of the southern Uí Néill. The latter's force consisted of troops from his home province of Meath (the Kingdom of Mide), probably with strong support from troops from Leinster and Ulster.

The battle ended in a devastating defeat for the Norse of Dublin.[1] Olaf abdicated and died in religious retirement in Iona.[1] Dublin was besieged by the victorious Máel Sechnaill, who forced it to surrender slaves and valuables, as well as give up all its prior claims to Uí Néill held territory.[1] In the following decade, Dublin was more or less under the control of Máel Sechnaill and the southern Uí Néill.

The Battle of Tara is regarded as a far more decisive defeat for the Norse of Dublin than the later, and much more famous, Battle of Clontarf. Olaf Cuaran was the last of the great Norse kings in Ireland, and following him the Kingdom of Dublin was never of the same status as before.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d  

Bibliography

External links

  • Ó Corraín:Vikings&Ireland

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