World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Baughan

Baughan
Former type Private company
Fate Purchased by Rondol Technology Ltd
Successors Rondol Technology
Founded 1920
Defunct 2003
Headquarters Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK
Key people Henry P. "Harry" Baughan[1]
Products Cyclecar and motorcycles

Baughan was a British cyclecar and motorcycle manufacturer in business from 1920 until 1936. Founded in 1920 in Harrow, Middlesex, from 1921 the company moved to Stroud, Gloucestershire. After motorcycle production finished the company continued in general engineering and plastics.[1]

Contents

  • H.P. Baughan 1
  • Production 2
  • Post-WW2 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

H.P. Baughan

Henry P. "Harry" Baughan was a well known

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h CJ Ayton (1985). Guide to Pre-War British Motorcycles. Temple Press.  
  2. ^ Culshaw; Horrobin (1974). Complete Catalogue of British Cars. London: Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-16689-2. 
  3. ^ Tragatsch, Erwin (2000). The New Illustrated Encyclopedia of Motorcycles. London: Quantum Publishing. p. 560.  

References

See also

Baughan Ltd continued to exist into the new millennium as a producer of plastics processing equipment. They manufactured a large range of equipment including single screw extruders and 2-roll mills, with much still in use today. The company was eventually acquired by Rondol Technology Ltd, a Staffordshire-based manufacturer of polymer processing equipment, who continue to support owners of the equipment.

Post-WW2

As World War 2 approached, and with his own sporting success ad that of his machines fading, Baughan focused his skills on the production of aircraft parts.[1]

After his own success in motorcycle trials in the early 1930s, Baughan began to make a range of trial-optimised motorcycles until 1936. Although a production template existed, each machine was a bespoke per-customer fitment.[1] Powered again using either Blackburne or mainly JAP V-twins, ranging in size from 250 to 500 cc,[3] each used qd real-wheel.[1] Production is believed to have been small.

In the 1920s, he had mae his own first four-wheel cyclecar, powered by an air-cooled JAP V twin. Asked by fellow competitors to make them a similar machine, he productionised it through use of a JAP of water-cooled Blackburne V-twin, of either 998 or 1097 cc. Drive was to the rear wheels through a Sturmey-Archer three-speed-and-reverse gearbox and chain final drive. The chassis had a wheelbase of 89 inches (2,300 mm) with suspension by quarter elliptic leaf springs all round.[2] Lightweight two-seat open bodies were fitted. Car production finished in 1925, but new cars were still listed for sale up to 1929. It is not known how many cars were made, but at least one survives.

Production

[1] From these sporting beginnings - at a time when making and experimenting with motorcycles was considered a normal, almost home-based art - Baughan began to make his own machines.[1] although he himself at the time lived in Harrow, Middlesex whilst working as an aircraft engineer.[1]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.