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Bicycle poverty reduction

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Title: Bicycle poverty reduction  
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Bicycle poverty reduction

Tanzanian boy transporting fodder on his bicycle to feed his family cattle

Bicycle poverty reduction is the concept that access to bicycles and the transportation infrastructure to support them can dramatically reduce poverty.[1][2][3][4] This has been demonstrated in various pilot projects in South Asia and Africa.[5][6][7] Experiments done in Africa (Uganda and Tanzania) and Sri Lanka on hundreds of households have shown that a bicycle can increase the income of a poor family by as much as 35%.[5][8][9] Transport, if analyzed for the cost–benefit analysis for rural poverty alleviation, has given one of the best returns in this regard. For example, road investments in India were a staggering 3–10 times more effective than almost all other investments and subsidies in rural economy in the decade of the 1990s. What a road does at a macro level to increase transport, the bicycle supports at the micro level. The bicycle, in that sense, can be one of the best means to eradicate poverty in poor nations.

Contents

  • Gallery 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4

Gallery

See also

References

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  5. ^ a b
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Further reading

  • Qhubeka: changing lives through bicycles
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