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Breezeway

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Breezeway

Breezeways connecting two buildings of the Main Street Complex in Voorhees, New Jersey.

A breezeway is an architectural feature similar to a hallway that allows the passage of a breeze between structures to accommodate high winds, allow aeration, or provide aesthetic design variation. Often a breezeway is a simple roof connecting two structures (such as a house and a garage); sometimes it can be much more like a tunnel with windows on either side. It may also refer to a hallway between two wings of a larger building -- such as between a house and a garage -- that lacks heating and cooling but allows sheltered passage.

One of the earliest breezeway designs to be architecturally designed and published was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1900 for the B. Harley Bradley House in Kankakee, Illinois. However, breezeway features had come into use in vernacular architecture long before this, as for example with the dogtrot breezeway that originally connected the two elements of a double log cabin on the North American frontier.

A breezeway rear window on a 1965 Mercury Monterey.

In automotive design terminology, the name breezeway has been used to describe the reverse-slanted, power-operated rear window ("backlite") which, when opened even slightly, provided through ventilation. Typical models with this feature are late-1950s Mercury Turnpike Cruisers and Park Lanes.

See also

References

External links

  • Media related to Breezeways at Wikimedia Commons
  • Residential breezeway image


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