World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Canby Area Transit

Canby Area Transit
Founded 2002
Locale Canby, Oregon
Service type bus service, paratransit
Website CAT homepage
A CAT bus in Oregon City, departing for Canby

Canby Area Transit, or simply CAT, is the public transit bus service provided by and for the US city of Canby, Oregon. As of 2015, it operates one fixed route between Woodburn, Canby and Oregon City along Oregon Route 99E, complementary paratransit, and a dial-a-ride service within the city of Canby. It has a hub at the downtown Canby Transit Center.

CAT was established as a department of the City of Canby on January 1, 2002 upon Canby's withdrawal from the TriMet service area, and had an official dedication on August 20, 2002.[1] Canby paid TriMet to continue service in the interim, and replaced TriMet's commuter runs in 2004, which received little ridership at the end.[2][3] CAT also expanded service within the city of Canby, to Woodburn and to Wilsonville, the latter in partnership with Wilsonville's South Metro Area Regional Transit. Canby replaced TriMet's payroll tax with its own within the city, but at a somewhat lower rate, and also receives state and federal grants.

Due to the loss of state tax credits and recession-caused tax revenue decreases, CAT had to eliminate Saturday service, fixed route service within Canby and trips to Wilsonville, as well as started charging a $1 fare. In exchange, they started to allow the general public to use dial-a-ride service within Canby that was previously limited to eligible disabled riders, and SMART continued to operate its trips from Wilsonville.[4][5]

Connecting systems

CAT connects to the following systems:

References

  1. ^ STEVEN AMICK (August 20, 2002). "THE CAT BUS SERVICE LANDS WITH FANFARE IN CANBY".  
  2. ^ TriMet September 2002 service changes
  3. ^ STEVE MAYES (January 19, 2004). "TRIMET PLANS AN EARLY EXIT FROM CANBYE, LAUNCHED IN 2002, OVER TRIMET'S 12 DAILY TRIPS".  
  4. ^ Canby Area Transit: Facts and Frequent Questions or Observations
  5. ^ Emily Fuggetta (June 8, 2011). "Canby reduces transit service by about one-third".  

External links

  • CAT official website
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.