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Centre Party (Sweden)

Centre Party
Centerpartiet
Leader Annie Lööf
Founded 1913
Headquarters Stora Nygatan 4, Gamla stan, Stockholm
Youth wing Centre Party Youth
Membership 37,340 (2009)[1]
Ideology Liberalism[2]
Social liberalism[3]
Agrarianism[4]
Political position Centre-right[5][6]
National affiliation The Alliance
International affiliation Liberal International
European affiliation Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe
European Parliament group Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe
Colors Green
Riksdag
22 / 349
European Parliament
1 / 20
County councils[7]
118 / 1,597
Municipal councils[8]
1,411 / 12,780
Website
http://www.centerpartiet.se/
Politics of Sweden
Political parties
Elections

The Centre Party[9] (Swedish: Centerpartiet, abbreviated C) is a liberal,[10][11] agrarian,[10][11] and social-liberal[3] political party in Sweden. Traditionally part of the Nordic agrarian family, the party has increasingly shifted its focus towards environmental protection, criticism of nuclear power, and decentralisation of governmental authority.[5]

The party was founded in 1913 as the Farmers' League (Torbjörn Fälldin was the leader of the Centre Party and Prime Minister in 1976–1982, except a short interregnum in 1978–1979 by Liberal People's Party leader Ola Ullsten. The Centre Party again joined a centre-right government following the 1991 election led by Moderate Party leader Carl Bildt. During the leaderships of Maud Olofsson and Annie Lööf in the 2000s the party has positioned itself clearly on the political right as a small business-friendly party, leaning towards neoliberal and libertarian policies and viewing the Social Democrats as its main opponent.[5][6][12]

In 2005 the Centre Party sold its ownership of the newspaper group Centertidningar AB for 1.8 billion SEK,[13] thus making it the richest political party in the world.[14]

Contents

  • 2006 Election 1
  • Specific standpoints 2
    • Immigration 2.1
    • European Union 2.2
  • Election results 3
  • Voters 4
  • Party Leaders 5
  • Current Members of Parliament 6
  • See also 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

2006 Election

The 2006 Swedish election was a success for the Centre Party. Its support had been slowly increasing through recent elections; in 1998 it received 5.1% of the votes, and this increased to 6.2% in 2002.[15] In the 2006 elections 7.88% of the vote went to the Centre Party, entitling them to 29 of the 349 seats in the Swedish Riksdag.[16] Furthermore, their alliance with the other parties in the Alliance for Sweden, a coalition which won a majority of parliament seats in this election, meant that the Centre Party shared the ministry posts with their Alliance for Sweden allies: the Moderate Party, the Liberal People's Party and the Christian Democrats.

Specific standpoints

Immigration

Centerpartiet is a pro-immigration party, and in their campaign for the Swedish general election, 2006, they proposed to double the number of immigrants entering Sweden to 90,000 persons, or 1 per cent of the Swedish population. This was to be facilitated by issuing green cards.[17]

In late 2012 the party stated it wanted to open the borders completely to immigration, including removing requirements for some degree of job skills and a clean criminal record. The party stressed the Canadian model and referred to it as a more successful one, stating that had Sweden had followed it the population of Sweden would have been over 40 million in 2012.[18] Along with other controversial new proposals, which included to make polygamy legal and end compulsory schooling, this caused turmoil with parts of the party's traditional rural base who claimed that the new proposals displayed a great rift between them and the party's neo-liberal "Stockholm Centre".[19][20]

European Union

Centerpartiet advocates a federative model for the European Union, governed by the principle of subsidiarity. The party is against the introduction of the euro in Sweden, and was a part of the winning no-side in the euro referendum in 2003.

In the European Parliament the Centre Party is a member of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE) Party.[21]

Election results

Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Government
1914 (Sep) 1,507 0.2 (#4)
0 / 230
0 in opposition
1917 39,262 5.3 (#5)
9 / 230
9 in opposition
1920 52,318 7.9 (#4)
20 / 230
11 in opposition
1921 192,269 11.0 (#4)
21 / 230
9 in opposition
1924 190,396 10.8 (#4)
23 / 230
2 in opposition
1928 263,501 11.2 (#4)
27 / 230
4 in opposition
1932 321,215 14.1 (#3)
36 / 230
9 in opposition
1936 418,840 14.4 (#3)
36 / 230
0 in opposition
1940 344,345 12.0 (#3)
28 / 230
8 in government
1944 421,094 13.6 (#3)
35 / 230
7 in government
1948 480,421 12.4 (#3)
30 / 230
5 in opposition
1952 406,183 10.7 (#4)
26 / 230
4 in government
1956 366,612 9.5 (#4)
19 / 231
7 in government
1958 486,760 12.7 (#4)
32 / 231
13 in opposition
1960 579,007 13.6 (#4)
34 / 232
2 in opposition
1964 559,632 13.2 (#4)
36 / 233
1 in opposition
1968 757,215 15.7 (#2)
39 / 233
3 in opposition
1970 991,208 19.9 (#2)
71 / 350
32 in opposition
1973 1,295,246 25.1 (#2)
90 / 350
19 in opposition
1976 1,309,669 24.1 (#2)
86 / 349
4 in government
1979 984,589 18.1 (#3)
64 / 349
22 in government
1982 859,618 15.5 (#3)
56 / 349
8 in opposition
1985 490,999 8.8 (#4)
43 / 349
13 in opposition
1988 607,240 11.3 (#4)
42 / 349
1 in opposition
1991 465,356 8.5 (#4)
31 / 349
11 in government
1994 425,153 7.7 (#3)
27 / 349
4 in opposition
1998 269,762 5.1 (#5)
18 / 349
9 in opposition
2002 328,428 6.19 (#6)
22 / 349
4 in opposition
2006 437,389 7.88 (#3)
29 / 349
7 in government
2010 390,804 6.56 (#5)
23 / 349
6 in government
2014 370,834 6.1 (#5)
22 / 349
1 in opposition

Voters

Centre Party election results for 2006, showing the significant focus of Centre Party support in rural areas.
  0-4.9%
  5-7.8%
  8-11.9%
  12-15.9%
  16%+

Traditionally, most of the voters and votebank come from rural areas and quite a few are farmers and agricultural producers. In recent years however, since the takeover of Maud Olofsson the party has been attracting liberal voters from urban areas in central Sweden. It is believed that voters from the Liberal People's Party have been moving to the Centre Party due to changes in both parties.[22]

Party Leaders

Current Members of Parliament

See also

References

  1. ^ Cederholm, Robert; Eliasson, Anders (15 March 2010). "Partierna tappar medlemmar". SVT. 
  2. ^ Wolfram Nordsieck. "Parties and Elections in Europe". Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Hans Slomp (2011). Europe, A Political Profile: An American Companion to European Politics: An American Companion to European Politics. ABC-CLIO. p. 433.  
  4. ^ David Blandford, Berkeley Hill (2006). Policy Reform and Adjustment in the Agricultural Sectors of Developed Countries. CABI. p. 110.  
  5. ^ a b c "The Centre Party - Centerpartiet", Sveriges Radio/Radio Sweden
  6. ^ a b "Guide: Centerpartiets historia och ideologi", DN, 2011-04-18
  7. ^ "2014: Val till landstingsfullmäktige - Valda", Valmyndigheten, 2014-09-28
  8. ^ "2014: Val till kommunfullmäktige - Valda", Valmyndigheten, 2014-09-26
  9. ^ "Other languages - Centerpartiet". Centerpartiet. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  10. ^ a b Svante Ersson; Jan-Erik Lane (1998). Politics and Society in Western Europe. SAGE. p. 108.  
  11. ^ a b T. Banchoff (1999). Legitimacy and the European Union. Taylor & Francis. p. 123.  
  12. ^ "'The Centre Party is a confused party': expert", The Local, 14 Jan 2013
  13. ^ Så styckas Centertidningar - Reklam & Media - E24.se
  14. ^ Privata Affärer - Centern blir världens rikaste politiska parti
  15. ^ Väljarbarometern samtliga
  16. ^ Allmänna val 17 september 2006
  17. ^ Centern vill fördubbla invandringen - Sverige - Sydsvenskan - Nyheter dygnet runt
  18. ^ "C vill ha helt fri invandring". Aftonbladet. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  19. ^ "Centre Party split over radical proposals", The Local, 29 Dec 2012
  20. ^ "Centre Party faces internal rebellion", The Local, 05 Jan 2013
  21. ^ "ALDE Party members". Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  22. ^ "Towards a two-party system? The Swedish parliamentary election of September 2006", Nicholas Aylott and Niklas Bolin, West European Politics, 2007 forthcoming

External links

  • Official website (Swedish)
  • The Swedish Parliament: The Centre Party
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