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Charter of the Arab League

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Title: Charter of the Arab League  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Economy of the Arab League, Council of the Arab League, Arab Parliament, History of the Arab League, Institutions of the Arab League
Collection: 1945 in Egypt, Arab League Treaties, Treaties Concluded in 1945, Treaties Establishing Intergovernmental Organizations, Treaties of Algeria, Treaties of Bahrain, Treaties of Djibouti, Treaties of Kuwait, Treaties of Lebanon, Treaties of Mauritania, Treaties of Morocco, Treaties of Oman, Treaties of Palestine, Treaties of Qatar, Treaties of Saudi Arabia, Treaties of the Comoros, Treaties of the Emirate of Transjordan, Treaties of the Kingdom of Egypt, Treaties of the Kingdom of Iraq, Treaties of the Kingdom of Libya, Treaties of the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen, Treaties of the Republic of the Sudan (1956–69), Treaties of the Somali Republic, Treaties of the Syrian Republic (1930–58), Treaties of the United Arab Emirates, Treaties of Tunisia
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Charter of the Arab League

The Charter of the Arab League (also known as the Pact of the League of Arab States) is the founding treaty of the Arab League. Concluded in 1945, the agreement endorses the principle of an Arab homeland while respecting the sovereignty of the individual member states. The internal regulations of the Council of the Arab League and the committees were agreed to in October 1951. Those of the Secretariat-General were agreed to in May 1953.

Since then, governance of the Arab League has been based on the duality of supra-national institutions and the sovereignty of the member states. Preservation of individual statehood derived its strengths from the natural preference of ruling elites to maintain their power and independence in decision making. Moreover, the fear of the richer that the poorer may share their wealth in the name of Arab nationalism, the feuds among Arab rulers, and the influence of external powers that might oppose Arab unity can be seen as obstacles towards a deeper integration of the league.

Initial signatories

The Charter was concluded on 22 March 1945 by the governments of Syria, Transjordan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt, and North Yemen. A state joins the Arab League by ratifying the Charter.

Forms of government

Arab League governments

The member states of the Arab League represent all forms of government, including monarchies, both absolute and constitutional, as well as republics.

Name Constitutional form Head of state Basis of executive legitimacy
 Algeria Republic Executive Presidency independent of legislature; ministry subject to parliamentary confidence
 Bahrain Constitutional monarchy Executive Monarch personally exercises power in concert with other institutions
 Comoros Republic Executive Presidency is independent of legislature
 Djibouti Republic Executive Presidency independent of legislature; ministry subject to parliamentary confidence
 Egypt Republic Executive Presidency independent of legislature; ministry subject to parliamentary confidence
 Iraq Republic Ceremonial Ministry is subject to parliamentary confidence
 Jordan Constitutional monarchy Executive Monarch personally exercises power in concert with other institutions
 Kuwait Constitutional monarchy Executive Monarch personally exercises power in concert with other institutions
 Lebanon Republic Ceremonial Ministry is subject to parliamentary confidence
 Libya Republic Ceremonial Ministry is subject to parliamentary confidence
 Mauritania Republic Executive Presidency independent of legislature; ministry subject to parliamentary confidence
 Morocco Constitutional monarchy Executive Monarch personally exercises power in concert with other institutions
 Oman Absolute monarchy Executive All authority vested in absolute monarch
 Qatar Absolute monarchy Executive All authority vested in absolute monarch
 Saudi Arabia Absolute monarchy Executive All authority vested in absolute monarch
 Somalia Republic Ceremonial Ministry is subject to parliamentary confidence
 Sudan Republic Executive Presidency is independent of legislature
 Syria n/a n/a No constitutionally-defined basis to current regime
 Tunisia Republic Executive Presidency independent of legislature; ministry subject to parliamentary confidence
 United Arab Emirates Constitutional monarchy Executive Monarch personally exercises power in concert with other institutions
 Yemen Republic Executive Presidency is independent of legislature

Autonomous entities

[[Image:Provinces - Arab League.PNG|thumb|right|Arab Governorates/Provinces

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