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Comic science fiction

 

Comic science fiction

Comic science fiction is a subgenre of soft science fiction or science fantasy that exploits the genre's conventions for comedic effect. Comic science fiction often mocks or satirizes standard SF conventions like alien invasion of Earth, interstellar travel, or futuristic technology.

An early example was the Pete Manx series by Henry Kuttner and Arthur K. Barnes (sometimes writing together and sometimes separately, under the house pen-name of Kelvin Kent). Published in Thrilling Wonder Stories in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the series featured a time-traveling carnival barker who uses his con-man abilities to get out of trouble. Two later series cemented Kuttner's reputation as one of the most popular early writers of comic science fiction: the Gallegher series (about a drunken inventor and his narcissistic robot) and the Hogben series (about a family of mutant hillbillies). The former appeared in Astounding Science Fiction in 1943 and 1948 and was collected in hardcover as Robots Have No Tails (Gnome, 1952), and the latter appeared in Thrilling Wonder Stories in the late 1940s.

Contents

  • Examples 1
    • Literature 1.1
    • Films 1.2
    • Video games 1.3
    • Machinima 1.4
    • Television 1.5
    • Web television 1.6
    • Web comics 1.7
    • Radio 1.8
    • Audio 1.9
    • Theatre 1.10
    • Multiple media 1.11
  • See also 2

Examples

Literature

Films

Video games

Machinima

Television

There are also any number of animated Japanese series which use a scifi-comedy or scifi-fantasy-comedy setting. Urusei Yatsura, Dr. Slump, FLCL and Tenchi Muyo! are examples.

Web television

Web comics

Radio

Audio

Theatre

  • Steve Jordan's play 'Dead Static' and its sequel 'Pilgrim Shadow'.

Multiple media

See also

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