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Constitution of Russia

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Title: Constitution of Russia  
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Subject: Politics of Russia, Government of Russia, Russia, Russian Constitution of 1978, Head of state
Collection: 1993 in Law, Constitutions of Russia
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Constitution of Russia


This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Russia

The current Constitution of the Russian Federation (Russian: Конституция Российской Федерации, Konstitutsiya Rossiyskoy Federatsii; pronounced ) was adopted by national referendum on December 12, 1993. Russia's constitution came into force on December 25, 1993, at the moment of its official publication, and abolished the Soviet system of government. The current Constitution is the most long-lived in the history of Russia, except for Stalin's constitution.

The 1993 Constitutional Conference was attended by over 800 participants. Sergei Alexeyev, Sergey Shakhray and sometimes Anatoly Sobchak are considered as co-authors of the constitution. The text of the constitution was inspired by Mikhail Speransky's constitutional project and current French constitution.[1]

A constitutional referendum was held in Russia on 12 December 1993. Of all registered voters, 58,187,755 people (or 54.8%) participated in the referendum. Of those, 32,937,630 (54.5%) voted for adoption of the Constitution.[2] It replaced the previous Soviet-era Constitution of April 12, 1978 of Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (which had already been amended in April 1992 to reflect the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the sovereignty of the Russian Federation), following the 1993 Russian constitutional crisis.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Constitutions in 19th and 20th centuries 1.1
    • Constitution of Russia after USSR 1.2
  • Structure 2
    • Section One 2.1
    • Section Two 2.2
  • Overview 3
    • Presidency 3.1
    • Executive branch 3.2
    • Legislative branch 3.3
    • Judiciary 3.4
    • Local government 3.5
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

History

Constitutions in 19th and 20th centuries

Constitution of Russia after USSR

Structure

The constitution is divided into two sections.

Section One

  1. Fundamentals of the Constitutional System
  2. Rights and Liberties of Man and Citizen
  3. Federative system
  4. President of the Russian Federation
  5. Federal Assembly
  6. Government of the Russian Federation
  7. Judiciary
  8. Local Self-Government
  9. Constitutional Amendments and Revisions

Section Two

  1. Concluding and Transitional Provisions

Overview

Especially on human rights and fundamental freedoms, the Constitution provides for human rights and freedom of citizen according to the universally recognised principles and norm of international law as well as the Constitution[3] and affirms that the listing in the Constitution of the Russian Federation of the fundamental rights and freedom shall not be interpreted as a rejection and derogation of other universally recognised human rights and freedom.[4]

Presidency

Dmitry Medvedev takes the presidential oath with his hand resting on the Constitution, May 7, 2008.

Executive branch

Legislative branch

Judiciary

Local government

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Sergey Shakhray - The Voice of Russia on YouTube
  2. ^ Constitution of Russia: nature, evolution, modernity 1.4.2 National character. (Russian)
  3. ^ Article 17
  4. ^ Article 55. 1

References

  • Partlett, William. The Dangers of Popular Constitution-Making, Brooklyn Journal of International Law, Volume 38, 193-238 (2012). Available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1924958.

External links

  • Text of the Constitution in Russian – from the official website of the Government of the Russian Federation
  • Text of the Constitution in English - archived from an official website of the Government of the Russian Federation
  • The Russian Constitution, with the Russian text and unofficial translations to English, German, and French
  • Information about the Russian Constitution



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