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Dhanvantari

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Dhanvantari

Dhanvantari
Ayurvedic medicine
Dhanvantari
Devanagari धन्वंतरी
Affiliation Avatar of Vishnu

Dhanvantari is an avatar of Vishnu in Hinduism. He appears in the Vedas and Puranas as the physician of the gods (devas), and the god of Ayurveda. It is common practice in Hinduism for worshipers to pray to Dhanvantari seeking his blessings for sound health for themselves and/or others, especially on Dhanteras.

Contents

  • The legend 1
  • Iconography 2
  • Birthday celebration 3
  • Temples in India 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

The legend

Bhagavata Purana states that Dhanvantari emerged from the Ocean of Milk and appeared with the pot of nectar during the story of the Samudra (or) Sagara Mathana whilst the ocean was being churned by the Devas and Asuras, using the Mandara mountain and the serpent Vasuki. The pot of Amrita was snatched by the Asuras, and after this event another avatar, Mohini, appears and takes the nectar back from the Asuras. It is also believed that Dhanvantari promulgated the practise of ayurveda.[1]

Iconography

According to the ancient Sanskrit work Vishnudharamottara, Dhanvantari is a handsome individual and should usually be depicted with four hands, with one of them carrying Amrita, the ambrosia of god. Dhanvantari is depicted as Vishnu with four hands, holding Shankha, Chakra, Jalauka (leech ) and a pot containing rejuvenating nectar called amrita. He is often shown with a leech in his hand rather than the scriptures.[1]

Birthday celebration

An idol of Dhanvantari at an Ayurveda Expo in Bangalore

His birthday is celebrated by the practitioners of Ayurveda every year, on Dhanteras, two days before Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights.

Statue of Dhanvantari at Taxakeshwar temple

Temples in India

There are no permanent temples to Dhanvantari in Northern India. The reason is not yet known, but in Varanaseya Sanskrit Vishwavidyalaya, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh state, one statue of Dhanvantari is present in the University museum. Two statues are at the headquarters of the Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha at New Delhi. There is another statue inside the Ayurveda Maha Sammelan office, Dhanawantari Bhawan at New Delhi and one statue of Dhanvantari is present at Mohyal Ashram in Haridwar.

There are a few dedicated temples to Dhanvantari in South India especially in Kerala and Tamil Nadu, where ayurveda is highly practised and patronised.

In Tamil Nadu, in the courtyard of Sri Ranganathaswamy Temple (Srirangam), there is a Dhanvantari shrine where daily worship of the deity is performed. In front of this temple there is an engraved stone believed to be from the 12th century. According to the writings on the stone, Garuda Vahana Bhattar, a great ayurvedic physician, established the statue inside the temple. A prasada or teertha, a herbal decoction, is given to the visitors. The shrine is the oldest Dhanvantari shrine in the state.[2] Another Dhanvantari shrine is found in the second precinct of Varadaraja Perumal Temple in Kanchipuram.[3]

Dhanvanthari temples in Kerala include:

  • Thevalakkadu Sree Dhanwanthari Temple, Kulasekharamangalam Post, Vaikom, Kottayam, Kerala[4]
  • Aanakkal Dhanwanthari Temple, Thaniyathukunnu, Thrissur[5]
  • Sree Dhanwanthari Temple, Ramanathapuram, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.[6]
  • Sree Dhanwanthari Temple , Maruthorvattom,Cherthala,Kerala State [7]

References

  1. ^ a b Madhavan 2007, p. 107
  2. ^ Madhavan 2007, p. 108
  3. ^ Madhavan 2007, p. 110
  4. ^ http://www.sreedhanwantharitemple.in
  5. ^ http://aanakkaldhanwanthari.com/home.htm
  6. ^ http://temples.avpayurveda.com
  7. ^ http://www.dhanwantharitemple.org
  • Madhavan, Chitra (2008). Vishnu temples of South India, Volume two. Chitra Madhavan.  
  • Kalyan Hindi monthly magazine, March 2001 issue, Geeta Press, Gorakhpur, UP

External links

  • Hindu God Dhanwantari: The promulgator of Ayurveda.
  • Does Ayurveda begin with Dhanvantari, the ancient physician? By D.P. Agrawal
  • Dhanvantari in the Bhagavata Purana
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