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Dimenhydrinate

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Title: Dimenhydrinate  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Meclizine, Pheniramine, Psychoactive drug, Chlorphenamine, Hyoscine hydrobromide
Collection: Antiemetics, Combination Drugs, Deliriants, H1 Receptor Antagonists, Motion Sickness, Muscarinic Antagonists
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Dimenhydrinate

Dimenhydrinate
Combination of
diphenhydramine antiemetic
8-chlorotheophylline stimulant
Clinical data
Trade names Dramamine
AHFS/Drugs.com
MedlinePlus
Pregnancy
category
  • AU: A
  • US: B (No risk in non-human studies)
Legal status
Routes of
administration
Oral, Rectal, I.V.
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  Y
ATC code R06AA52
PubChem CID:
DrugBank  Y
ChemSpider  Y
UNII  Y
KEGG  Y
ChEMBL  N
 N   

Dimenhydrinate (marketed as Dramamine, Gravol and many other brand names) is an over-the-counter antiemetic used for the treatment of the symptoms of motion sickness. It is most commonly prepared as tablets, although it is also available in liquid form and in suppositories. Dimenhydrinate is a combination of two drugs: diphenhydramine and 8-chlorotheophylline.

Contents

  • Medical uses 1
  • Veterinary use 2
  • Brand names 3
  • References 4

Medical uses

Dimenhydrinate is primarily used to treat nausea, vomiting, and dizziness caused by motion sickness.[1] Dimenhydrinate has also been found to aid in the treatment of ear congestion.

Diphenhydramine is the primary constituent of dimenhydrinate and dictates the primary effect. The main difference relative to pure diphenhydramine is a lower potency due to being combined with 8-chlorotheophylline. By weight, dimenhydrinate is between 53% to 55.5% diphenhydramine.[2]

8-Chlorotheophylline, a chlorinated derivative of theophylline, was added in order to counteract drowsiness. Theophylline is very closely related to caffeine and theobromine, mild central nervous system stimulants. It was thought by scientists that by combining the antiemetic effects of diphenhydramine with a stimulant, the extreme drowsiness induced by the former could be mitigated somewhat by the latter. The sedation caused by diphenhydramine, however, is substantially stronger than the stimulation caused by 8-chlorotheophylline, so the overall effect is still mostly sedating.

Veterinary use

Dimenhydrinate has successfully been used as an antiemetic and sedative in housepets.[3] It is commonly used to reduce the effects of idiopathic vestibular syndrome. The suggested dosage is 50 mg for dogs and 10 mg for cats; duration of effect is 8 hours. This dosage is not a proper measure for all pets and should be adjusted by weight.

Brand names

Dimenhydrinate is marketed under many brand names: in the USA and Serbia as Dramamine, in Ukraine as Driminate, in India and Canada as Gravol, in Iceland and Russia as Gravamin, in South Africa and Germany as Vomex, in Australia and Austria as Vertirosan, in Brazil as Dramin, in Ecuador as Anautin, in Hungary as Daedalon, in Sweden as Amosyt, in Indonesia as Antimo, in Italy as Xamamina, in Peru as Gravicoll, in Poland as Aviomarin,[4] in Portugal as Viabom, in Spain as Biodramina, in Thailand as ไดเมนนีน (Daimenin), and in Pakistan as Gravinate.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Dimenhydrinate". MedlinePlus. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  2. ^ "DIMENHYDRINATE injection, solution". Daily Med. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  3. ^ "Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine®)". Pet Education. Doctors Foster and Smith. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  4. ^ http://www.doz.pl/apteka/p5336-Aviomarin_tabletki_50_mg_5_szt
  5. ^ http://www.searlecompany.com/gravinate.html
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