Fifa world cup records

This is a list of records of the FIFA World Cup and its qualification matches.

Contents

Teams: tournament position

Teams having equal quantities in the tables below are ordered by the tournament the quantity was attained in (the teams that attained the quantity first are listed first). If the quantity was attained by more than one team in the same tournament, these teams are ordered alphabetically.

Most championships

5,  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002)

# Team #
1  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002) 5
2  Italy (1934, 1938, 1982, 2006) 4
3  Germany (1954, 1974, 1990) 3
4  Uruguay (1930, 1950),  Argentina (1978, 1986) 2
6  England (1966),  France (1998),  Spain (2010) 1

Most second-place finishes

4,  Germany (1966, 1982, 1986, 2002)

# Team #
1  Germany (1966, 1982, 1986, 2002) 4
2  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010) 3
3  Argentina (1930, 1990)  Brazil (1950, 1998)  Czechoslovakia[1](1934, 1962)  Hungary (1938, 1954)  Italy (1970, 1994) 2
4  France (2006)  Sweden (1958) 1

Most finishes in the top two

7,  Brazil (1950, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 1998, 2002),  Germany (1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002)

# Team #
1  Brazil (1950, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 1998, 2002),  Germany (1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002) 7
3  Italy (1934, 1938, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006) 6
4  Argentina (1930, 1978, 1986, 1990) 4
5  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010) 3
6  Uruguay (1930, 1950),  Hungary (1938, 1954),  Czechoslovakia[2] (1934, 1962),  France (1998, 2006) 2
10  Sweden (1958),  England (1966),  Spain (2010) 1

Most third-place finishes

4,  Germany (1934, 1970, 2006, 2010)

# Team #
1  Germany(1934, 1970, 2006, 2010) 4
2  Brazil(1938, 1978)  France(1958, 1986)  Poland(1974, 1982)  Sweden(1950, 1994) 2
3  Austria(1954)  Chile(1962)  Croatia(1998)  Italy(1990)  Portugal(1966)  Turkey(2002)  United States(1930) 1

Most finishes in the top three

11,  Germany (1934, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010)

# Team #
1  Germany (1934, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010) 11
2  Brazil (1938, 1950, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002) 9
3  Italy (1934, 1938, 1970, 1982, 1990, 1994, 2006) 7
4  Argentina (1930, 1978, 1986, 1990),  France (1958, 1986, 1998, 2006) 4
6  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010),  Sweden (1950, 1958, 1994) 3
8  Czechoslovakia[2] (1934, 1962),  Hungary (1938, 1954),  Poland (1974, 1982),  Uruguay (1930, 1950) 2
12  Austria (1954),  Chile (1962),  Croatia(1998),  England (1966),  Portugal (1966),  Spain (2010),  Turkey (2002),  United States (1930) 1

Most fourth-place finishes

3,  Uruguay (1954, 1970, 2010)

# Team #
1  Uruguay(1954, 1970, 2010) 3
2  Yugoslavia[3] (1930, 1962) 2
3  Austria(1934)  Belgium(1986)  Brazil(1974)  Bulgaria(1994)  England(1990)  France(1982)  Germany(1958)  Italy(1978)  South Korea(2002)  Netherlands(1998)  Portugal(2006)  Russia(1966)  Spain(1950)  Sweden(1938) 1

Most 3rd–4th-place finishes

5,  Germany (1934, 1958, 1970, 2006, 2010)

# Team #
1  Germany(1934, 1958, 1970, 2006, 2010) 5
2  Brazil(1938, 1974 ,1978)  France(1958, 1982, 1986)  Sweden(1938, 1950, 1994) Uruguay(1954, 1970, 2010) 3
3  Poland(1974, 1978)  Yugoslavia[3] (1930, 1962) Austria(1934, 1954) Italy(1978, 1990) Portugal(1966, 2006) 2
4  Belgium(1986)  Bulgaria(1994)  England(1990)  South Korea(2002)  Netherlands(1998)  Russia(1966)  Spain(1950)  Chile(1962)  Croatia(1998)  Turkey(2002)  United States(1930) 1

Most finishes in the top four

12,  Germany (1934, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010)

# Team #
1  Germany (1934, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010) 12
2  Brazil (1938, 1950, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1974, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002) 10
3  Italy (1934, 1938, 1970, 1978, 1982, 1990, 1994, 2006) 8
4  France (1958, 1982, 1986, 1998, 2006) Uruguay (1930, 1950, 1954, 1970, 2010) 5
5  Argentina (1930, 1978, 1986, 1990) Netherlands (1974, 1978, 1998, 2010) Sweden (1938, 1950, 1958, 1994) 4
6  Austria(1934, 1954) England(1966, 1990) Hungary(1938, 1954) Poland(1974, 1982)  Portugal (1966, 2006) Spain (1950, 2010) Czechoslovakia[2](1934, 1962) Yugoslavia[3](1930, 1962) 2
7  Belgium(1986) Bulgaria(1994) Chile(1962) Croatia(1998) South Korea(2002) Turkey(2002)  Soviet Union(1966) United States(1930) 1
For a detailed list of top four appearances, see FIFA World Cup results

Most 5th–8th-place finishes

8,  England (1950, 1954, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 2002, 2006)[4]

# Team #
1  England(1950, 1954, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 2002, 2006) 8
2  Brazil(1930, 1954, 1982, 1986, 2006, 2010) 6
3  Argentina(1966, 1974, 1998, 2006, 2010)  Yugoslavia[3](1950, 1954, 1958, 1974, 1990) 5
4  Germany(1962, 1978, 1994, 1998)  Russia(1958, 1962, 1970, 1982)  Spain(1934, 1986, 1994, 2002)   Switzerland(1934, 1938, 1950, 1954) 4
5  Hungary(1934, 1962, 1966) 3
6  Austria (1978, 1982)  Czechoslovakia[2](1938, 1990) France(1930, 1938)  Italy(1950, 1998) Mexico(1970, 1986) Peru(1970, 1978) Romania(1930, 1994)  Sweden(1934, 1974) 2
7  Chile(1930)  Cameroon(1990)  Cuba(1938)  Denmark(1998)  East Germany(1974)  Ghana(2010)  Republic of Ireland(1990)  Paraguay(2010)  Poland(1978)  North Korea(1966)  Netherlands(1994)  Northern Ireland(1958)  Senegal(2002) Ukraine(2006)  Uruguay(1966)  United States(2002)  Wales(1958) 1

Most finishes in the top eight

16,  Brazil (Every tournament except 1934, 1966 and 1990),  Germany (Every tournament except 1930, 1938 and 1950)[5]

# Team #
1  Brazil (1930, 1938, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010)

 Germany (1934, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010)

16
2  Italy (1934, 1938, 1970, 1978, 1982, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006)  Argentina (1930, 1966, 1974, 1978, 1986, 1990, 1998, 2006, 2010)  England ( 1954, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006) 9
3  France ( 1930, 1938, 1958, 1982, 1986, 1998, 2006 )  Yugoslavia[3](1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1974, 1990) 7
4  Spain (1934, 1950, 1986, 1994, 2002, 2010)  Sweden (1934, 1938, 1950, 1958, 1974, 1994)  Uruguay (1930, 1950, 1954, 1966, 1970, 2010) 6
5  Hungary (1934, 1938, 1954, 1962, 1966) Netherlands (1974, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2010) Russia (1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1982) 5
6  Austria (1934, 1954, 1978, 1982) Czechoslovakia[2](1934, 1938, 1962, 1990)  Switzerland (1934, 1938, 1950, 1954) 4
7  Poland(1974, 1978, 1982) 3
8  Chile(1930 ,1962) Mexico(1970, 1986)  Peru(1970, 1978) Portugal(1966, 2006) Romania(1930, 1994) United States(1930, 2002) 2
9  Belgium(1986) Bulgaria(1994) Cameroon(1990) Croatia(1998) Cuba(1938) Denmark(1998) East Germany(1974) Ghana(2010) Republic of Ireland(1990)  South Korea(2002)  Northern Ireland(1958) Paraguay(2010)  North Korea(1966) Senegal(2002)  Turkey(2002)  Ukraine(2006)  Wales(1958) 1

Most 9th–16th-place finishes

12,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010)[6]

# Team #
1  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010) 12
2  Belgium (1930, 1934, 1938, 1954, 1970, 1982, 1990, 1994, 2002) 9
3  Italy (1954, 1962, 1966, 1974, 1986, 2002)  Paraguay (1930, 1950, 1958, 1986, 1998, 2002)  Spain (1962, 1966, 1978, 1982, 1990, 2006) 6
4  Argentina (1934, 1958, 1962, 1982, 1994)  Bulgaria (1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1986)  Chile (1950, 1966, 1974, 1998, 2010) Romania (1934, 1938, 1970, 1990, 1998) Scotland (1958, 1962, 1974, 1978, 1982) 5
5  France  Netherlands  Slovakia  Sweden   Switzerland  Uruguay  United States 4
6  Brazil  Czech Republic[1]  England  Hungary 3
7  Australia  Bolivia  Colombia  Denmark  Japan  South Korea  Morocco  Nigeria  Norway  Poland  Republic of Ireland  Yugoslavia 2
8  Austria  Algeria  Congo DR[7]  Costa Rica  Ecuador  El Salvador  Egypt  Germany  Ghana  Haiti  Indonesia[8]  Iran  Israel  Northern Ireland  Peru  Portugal  Russia  Saudi Arabia  Tunisia  Turkey 1

Most finishes in the top sixteen

19,  Brazil (every tournament).

Most 17th–32nd-place finishes

5,  South Korea (1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006)  Cameroon (1982, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2010)

# Team #
1  South Korea (1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006)  Cameroon (1982, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2010) 5
2  Russia  Saudi Arabia  Scotland  South Africa  Tunisia  United States 3
3  Algeria  Austria  Colombia  Costa Rica  Ivory Coast  Croatia  Czech Republic[1]  France  Greece  Honduras  Iran  Japan  Morocco  New Zealand  Nigeria  Poland  Portugal  Yugoslavia  Slovenia 2
3  Angola  Argentina  Australia  Belgium  Bolivia  Bulgaria  Canada  Chile  China PR  Denmark  Ecuador  Egypt  El Salvador  Hungary  Iraq  Italy  Jamaica  North Korea  Kuwait  Northern Ireland  Norway  Paraguay  Peru  Slovakia[1]  Spain  Sweden   Switzerland  Togo  Trinidad and Tobago  United Arab Emirates  Uruguay 1

Most World Cup appearances

20,  Brazil (every tournament).

For a detailed list, see National team appearances in the FIFA World Cup
# Team #
1  Brazil 20
2  Italy,  Germany[9] 17
3  Argentina 15
4  Mexico 14
5  England,  France,  Spain 13
6  Belgium,  Sweden,  Uruguay,  Yugoslavia[3] 11
7  Czech Republic,[1]  Hungary,  South Korea,  Netherlands,  Russia,[10]  Slovakia,[1]   Switzerland,  United States 9
8  Chile,  Paraguay,  Scotland 8
9  Austria,  Bulgaria,  Poland,  Romania 7
10  Cameroon 6
11  Japan,  Portugal 5
12  Australia,  Colombia,  Denmark,  Iran,  Morocco,  Nigeria,  Peru,  Saudi Arabia,  Tunisia 4
13  Algeria,  Bolivia,  Costa Rica,  Croatia,[3]  Northern Ireland,  Norway,  Republic of Ireland,  South Africa 3
14  Ivory Coast,  Ecuador,  Egypt,  Ghana,  Greece,  Honduras,  New Zealand,  North Korea,  El Salvador,  Slovenia,[3]  Turkey 2
15  Angola (2006),  Canada (1986),  China PR (2002),  Congo DR[7](1974),  Cuba (1938),  East Germany[9] (1974),  Haiti (1974),  Indonesia[8] (1938),  Iraq (1986),  Israel (1970),  Jamaica (1998),  Kuwait (1982),  Senegal (2002),  Togo (2006),  Trinidad and Tobago(2006),  Ukraine[10] (2006),  United Arab Emirates (1990),  Wales(1958),  Bosnia and Herzegovina(2014) 1

Consecutive

Most consecutive championships

# Team #
1  Brazil (1958–1962)  Italy (1934–1938) 2

Most consecutive second-place finishes

2,  Netherlands (1974–1978) and  Germany (1982–1986).

Most consecutive finishes in the top two

# Team #
1  Brazil (1994–2002)  Germany (1982–1990) 3
2  Argentina (1986–1990) Brazil(1958–1962) Italy(1934–1938) Netherlands(1974–1978) 2

Most consecutive third-place finishes

2,  Germany (2006–2010).

Most consecutive finishes in the top three

# Team #
1  Germany (1966–1974), (1982–1990), (2002–2010) Brazil (1994–2002) 3
3  Argentina (1986–1990)  Italy (1934–1938),(1990–1994)  Netherlands (1974–1978) 2

Most consecutive fourth-place finishes

No team has finished 4th in two consecutive tournaments.

Most consecutive 3rd–4th-place finishes

2,  Sweden (1938–1950),  Brazil (1974–1978),  France (1982–1986),  Germany (2006–2010).

Most consecutive finishes in the top four

Either Germany or Brazil has finished in the top four of every World Cup except 1930.

# Team #
1  Brazil (1960–1978, 1994–2002)  Germany (1966–1974, 1982–1990, 2002–2010) 3
2  Argentina (1986–1990),  Brazil (1938–1950, 1958–1962),  France (1982–1986),  Germany (1954–1958),  Italy (1934–1938, 1978–1982, 1990–1994)  Netherlands (1974–1978),  Sweden (1938–1950),  Uruguay (1950–1954) 2

Most consecutive 5th–8th-place finishes

4,   Switzerland (1934–1954).[11]

Most consecutive finishes in the top eight

# Team #
1  Germany (1954–2010) 15
2  Brazil (1938–1962)(1970–1986)(1994–2010) 5
3  Russia (1958–1970)  Yugoslavia (1950–1962)   Switzerland (1934–1954) 4
4  England (1962–1970)(1982–1990)  Italy (1934–1950)(1990–1998)  Poland (1974–1982)  Sweden (1934–1950) 3
5  Argentina (1974–1978)(1986–1990)(2006–2010)  Austria (1978–1982)  Czech Republic (1934–1938)  England (1950–1954)(2002–2006)  France (1982–1986)  Hungary (1934–1938)(1962–1966)  Italy (1978–1982)  Netherlands (1974–1978)(1994–1998)  Uruguay (1950–1954)(1966–1970) 2
Most consecutive 9th–16th-place finishes
5,  Mexico (1950–1966), (1994–2010)[12]
Most consecutive finishes in the top sixteen
19,  Brazil (1930–2010).
Most consecutive 17th–32nd-place finishes
4,  South Korea (1986–1998).
Most consecutive appearances in the finals
19,  Brazil (1930–2010).
Biggest improvement in position in consecutive tournaments
  • Declined to participate, then champion:  Italy (1930–1934),  Uruguay (1938–1950)
  • Banned from participating, then champion:  West Germany (1950–1954)
  • Failed to qualify, then champion:  France (1994–1998)

Gaps

Longest gap between successive titles
44 years,  Italy (1938–1982)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two
48 years,  Argentina (1930–1978)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top three
48 years,  Argentina (1930–1978)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four
60 years,  Spain (1950–2010)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top eight
72 years,  United States (1930–2002)[13]
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top sixteen
60 years,  Norway (1938–1998)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the finals
56 years:  Egypt (1934–1990),  Norway (1938–1994)[14]

Host team

Best finish by host team
Champion,  Uruguay (1930),  Italy (1934),  England (1966),  West Germany (1974),  Argentina (1978),  France (1998)
Worst finish by host team
17th–32nd position (FIFA final ranking of 20th),  South Africa (2010)

Defending champion

Best finish by defending champion
champion,  Italy (1938),  Brazil (1962)
Worst finish by defending champion
did not participate,  Uruguay (1934)
Worst finish by defending champion which took part in subsequent finals
28th (of 32),  France (2002)

Debuting teams

Best finish by a debuting team
champion,  Uruguay(1930),  Italy(1934)
Best finish by a debuting team after 1934
Third place,  Portugal(1966),  Croatia(1998)

Other

Most finishes in the top two without ever being champion
3,  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010)
Most finishes in the top four without ever being champion
4,  Sweden (1938, 1950, 1958, 1994),  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 1998, 2010)
Most finishes in the top eight without ever being champion
7,  Yugoslavia (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1974, 1990)[15]
Most finishes in the top sixteen without ever being champion
14,  Mexico (all except 1934, 1938, 1974, 1982 and 1990)
Most appearances without ever being champion
14,  Mexico (all except 1934, 1938, 1974, 1982 and 1990)
Most finishes in the top four without ever finishing in the top two
2,  Austria (1934, 1954),  Yugoslavia (1930, 1962),  Poland (1974, 1982),  Portugal (1966, 2006)
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top two
7,  Yugoslavia (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1974, 1990)[16]
Most finishes in the top sixteen without ever finishing in the top two
14,  Mexico (all except 1934, 1938, 1974, 1982 and 1990)
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top two
14,  Mexico (all except 1934, 1938, 1974, 1982 and 1990)
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top four
4,   Switzerland (1934, 1938, 1950, 1954)[17]
Most finishes in the top sixteen without ever finishing in the top four
14,  Mexico (all except 1934, 1938, 1974, 1982 and 1990)
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top four
14,  Mexico (all except 1934, 1938, 1974, 1982 and 1990)
Most finishes in the top sixteen without ever finishing in the top eight
4,  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978)
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top eight
8,  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top sixteen
3,  South Africa (1998, 2002, 2010)

Players: tournament position

Qualification: at least one appearance in each Finals tournament

Most championships

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Pelé  Brazil 1958 4 6 12 18 67
1962 2 6
1970 6 6

Most finishes in the top two

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Pierre Littbarski  West Germany 1982 7 7 18 21 86
1986 5 7
1990 6 7
Lothar Matthäus  West Germany 1982 2 7 16 21 76
1986 7 7
1990 7 7
Cafu  Brazil 1994 3 7 16 21 76
1998 6 7
2002 7 7
Pelé  Brazil 1958 4 6 12 18 67
1962 2 6
1970 6 6

Most finishes in the top three

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Wolfgang Overath  West Germany 1966 6 6 19 19 100
1970 6 6
1974 7 7
Franz Beckenbauer  West Germany 1966 6 6 18 19 95
1970 5 6
1974 7 7
Miroslav Klose  Germany 2002 7 7 19 21 90
2006 7 7
2010 5 7
Pierre Littbarski  West Germany 1982 7 7 18 21 86
1986 5 7
1990 6 7
Lothar Matthäus  West Germany 1982 2 7 16 21 76
1986 7 7
1990 7 7
Cafu  Brazil 1994 3 7 16 21 76
1998 6 7
2002 7 7
Pelé  Brazil 1958 4 6 12 18 67
1962 2 6
1970 6 6
Horst-Dieter Höttges  West Germany 1966 5 6 10 19 53
1970 4 6
1974 1 7

Most finishes in the top four

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Wolfgang Overath  West Germany 1966 6 6 19 19 100
1970 6 6
1974 7 7
Franz Beckenbauer  West Germany 1966 6 6 18 19 95
1970 5 6
1974 7 7
Uwe Seeler  West Germany 1958 5 6 17 18 94
1966 6 6
1970 6 6
Miroslav Klose  Germany 2002 7 7 19 21 90
2006 7 7
2010 5 7
Pierre Littbarski  West Germany 1982 7 7 18 21 86
1986 5 7
1990 6 7
Lothar Matthäus  West Germany 1982 2 7 16 21 76
1986 7 7
1990 7 7
Cafu  Brazil 1994 3 7 16 21 76
1998 6 7
2002 7 7
Rivelino  Brazil 1970 5 6 15 20 75
1974 7 7
1978 3 7
Karl-Heinz Schnellinger  West Germany 1958 2 6 13 18 72
1966 6 6
1970 5 6
Pelé  Brazil 1958 4 6 12 18 67
1962 2 6
1970 6 6
Horst-Dieter Höttges  West Germany 1966 5 6 10 19 53
1970 4 6
1974 1 7

Most finishes in the top eight

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Lothar Matthäus  West Germany 1982 2 7 25 31 81
1986 7 7
1990 7 7
 Germany 1994 5 5
1998 4 5

Coaches: tournament position

Most championships
2, Vittorio Pozzo  Italy (1934, 1938)
Most finishes in the top two
2, Vittorio Pozzo  Italy (1934, 1938); Helmut Schön  West Germany (1966, 1974); Carlos Bilardo  Argentina (1986, 1990); Franz Beckenbauer  West Germany (1986, 1990); Mário Zagallo  Brazil (1970, 1998)
Most finishes in the top three
3, Helmut Schön  West Germany (1966, 1970, 1974)
Most finishes in the top four
3, Helmut Schön  West Germany (1966, 1970, 1974); Mário Zagallo  Brazil (1970, 1974, 1998)
Most finishes in the top eight
4, Helmut Schön  West Germany (1966, 1970, 1974, 1978);

Teams: tournament progress

All time

Most appearances in the first round
19  Brazil (every tournament)
Progressed from the first round the most times
16  Germany (every tournament except 1930, 1938 and 1950),  Brazil (every tournament except 1930, 1934 and 1966)
Eliminated in the first round the most times
8  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
Most appearances, always progressing from the first round
3  Republic of Ireland (1990, 1994, 2002)[18]
Most appearances, never progressing from the first round
8  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)[19]

Consecutive

Most consecutive appearances in the first round
19  Brazil (every tournament)
Most consecutive progressions from the first round
15  Germany (1954–2010)
Most consecutive eliminations from the first round
5  Mexico (1950–1966),  Scotland (1974–1990)

Host team

Host team eliminated in the first round
 South Africa (2010)

Defending champion

Defending champion eliminated in the first round
 Italy (1950 and 2010),  Brazil (1966),  France (2002)

Teams: matches played and goals scored

All time

Most matches played
99,  Germany
Fewest matches played
1,  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies)
Most wins
67,  Brazil
Most losses
24,  Mexico
Most draws
21,  Italy
Most matches played without a win or a draw
6,  El Salvador
Most matches played without a win
6,  Bolivia,  El Salvador,  Honduras,  New Zealand
Most matches played until first win
17,  Bulgaria
Most goals scored
210,  Brazil
Most goals conceded
117,  Germany
Fewest goals scored
0,  Canada,  China PR,  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies),  Trinidad and Tobago, and  Congo DR (as  Zaire).
Fewest goals conceded
2,  Angola
Most matches played without scoring a goal
3,  Canada,  China PR,  Trinidad and Tobago, and  Congo DR (as  Zaire).
Most matches played always conceding a goal
6,  El Salvador,  Greece
Highest average of goals scored per match
2.72,  Hungary
Lowest average of goals conceded per match
0.67,  Angola (2 goals in 3 matches)[20]
Highest average of goals conceded per match
6  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies)
Lowest average of goals both scored and conceded per match
1  Angola
Highest average of goals both scored and conceded per match
6  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies)
Most meetings between two teams
7 times,  Brazil vs  Sweden (1938, 1950, 1958, 1978, 1990 and twice in 1994)

7 times,  Germany vs  Serbia (1954, 1958, 1962, 1974, 1990, 1998, 2010)

Most meetings between two teams, Final match
2 times,  Brazil vs  Italy (1970 & 1994) &  Argentina vs  Germany (1986 & 1990)
Most tournaments unbeaten
[21] 7,  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 2002)
Most tournaments eliminated without having lost a match
[21] 3,  England (1982, 1990,[22] 2006)
Most tournaments eliminated without having won a match
6,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1978) and  Bulgaria (1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1986, 1998)

In one tournament

Most wins
[23] 7,  Brazil, 2002
Fewest wins, champions
3,  Uruguay, 1950 (out of 4)[24]
Most matches not won, champions
3,  Italy 1982 (out of 7)
Most wins by non-champion (excluding third-place playoff)
[25] 6,  Netherlands, 2010[26]
Most matches not won
[21] 5,  Yugoslavia 1974,  Argentina 1974,  West Germany 1978,  Belgium 1986,  Republic of Ireland 1990,  Argentina 1990.
Most matches not won in regulation time
6,  Belgium in 1986 and  England in 1990.
Most losses
3 (28 teams, of which only  Mexico has accomplished this feat at three different tournaments: 1930, 1950 and 1978)
Most losses, champions
1,  Germany, 1954 and 1974;  Argentina, 1978;  Spain, 2010
Most victories over former World Cup winning teams
[21] 3,  Brazil (1970),  Italy (1982),  Argentina (1986),  Germany (2010).[27]
All matches won without extra time, replays, penalty shootouts or playoffs
 Uruguay 1930 (4 matches),  Brazil 1970 (6 matches) and  Brazil 2002 (7 matches).
Highest finish without winning a match
[21] last eight  Republic of Ireland (1990)
Highest finish, winning at most one match
[21] fourth  Sweden (1938)[28]
Most goals scored
27,  Hungary, 1954[29]
Fewest goals conceded
0,   Switzerland, 2006[29]
Most goals conceded
16,  South Korea, 1954[29]
Most minutes without conceding a goal
517 mins,  Italy, 1990[29]
Highest goal difference
+17,  Hungary, 1954[29]
Highest goal difference, champions
+14,  Brazil, 2002[29]
Lowest goal difference
-16,  South Korea, 1954[29]
Lowest goal difference, champions
+6,  Italy, 1982,  Spain, 2010[29]
Highest average of goals scored per match
5.40,  Hungary, 1954;[29]
Highest average goal difference per match
+3.2,  Hungary, 1954
Highest average goal difference per match, champions
+3.0,  Uruguay, 1930
Most goals scored, champions
25,  Germany, 1954[29]
Fewest goals scored, champions
8,  Spain, 2010[29]
Fewest goals scored, finalists
5,  Argentina, 1990[29]
Fewest goals conceded, champions
2,  France, 1998,  Italy, 2006,  Spain, 2010[29]
Most goals conceded, champions
14,  Germany, 1954[29]
Lowest average of goals scored per match, champions
1.14,  Spain, 2010[29]
Most unbeaten teams
5, 2006 (  Switzerland,  Argentina,  England,  France,  Italy)[21]
Fewest unbeaten teams
0, 1954
Most matches to qualify for World Cup Finals
20,  Uruguay (2002 & 2010)
Largest distance travelled in a single qualifying campaign
55,000 miles:  New Zealand (1982)[30]

Teams: overall performance (winning percentage)

In one tournament

All time

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Uruguay (1930) 4 4 0 0 100 15 3 +12 +3.0 3.8
 Brazil (1970) 6 6 0 0 100 19 7 +12 +2.0 3.2
 Brazil (2002) 7 7 0 0 100 18 4 +14 +2.0 2.6
 Italy (1938) 4 4* 0 0 100 11 5 +6 +1.5 2.8

* one of the wins was after extra time

Worst overall performance
Because a large number of teams have had lost all their matches in a world cup, only teams with a goal difference/match ≤ -4.0 are included.
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 South Korea (1954) 2 0 0 2 0 0 16 −16 −8.0 0.0
 Bolivia (1950) 1 0 0 1 0 0 8 −8 −8.0 0.0
 Dutch East Indies (1938) 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 −6 −6.0 0.0
 United States (1934) 1 0 0 1 0 1 7 −6 −6.0 1.0
 Zaire (1974) 3 0 0 3 0 0 14 −14 −4.7 0.0
 Saudi Arabia (2002) 3 0 0 3 0 0 12 −12 −4.0 0.0
 Bolivia (1930) 2 0 0 2 0 0 8 −8 −4.0 0.0
 Scotland (1954) 2 0 0 2 0 0 8 −8 −4.0 0.0
 El Salvador (1982) 3 0 0 3 0 1 13 −12 −4.0 0.3
 Haiti (1974) 3 0 0 3 0 2 14 −12 −4.0 0.7

Host team

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Uruguay (1930) 4 4 0 0 100 15 3 +12 +3.0 3.8
Worst overall performance

The following teams had a negative overall record as hosts:

Team Round reached Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 South Africa (2010) First (last 32) 3 1 1 1 33 3 5 −2 −0.67 1.00
 United States (1994) Second (last 16) 4 1 1 2 25 3 4 −1 −0.25 0.75
 Spain (1982) Second (last 12) 5 1 2 2 20 4 5 −1 −0.20 0.80

Defending champion

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Italy (1938) 4 4* 0 0 100 11 5 +6 +1.5 2.8

* one of the wins was after extra time

Worst overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 France (2002) 3 0 1 2 0 0 3 −3 −1.0 0.0

Champion

Best overall performance
see all-time best overall performance above
Worst overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Italy (1982) 7 4 3 0 79 12 6 +6 +0.9 +1.7

Non-champion

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Italy (1990) 7 6 1 0 93 10 2 +8 +1.1 +1.4
Worst overall performance
see all-time worst overall performance above

Streaks

Most consecutive successful qualification attempts
[31] 8,  Spain (1986–2014).
Most consecutive failed qualification attempts
19,  Luxembourg (19342014).
Most consecutive wins
11,  Brazil, from 2–1 Turkey (2002) to 3–0 Ghana (2006).
Most consecutive matches without a loss
13,  Brazil, from 3–0 Austria (1958) to 2–0 Bulgaria (1966).
Most consecutive losses
9,  Mexico, from 1–4 France (1930) to 0–3 Sweden (1958)
Most consecutive matches without a win
17,  Bulgaria, from 0–1 Argentina (1962) to 0–3 Nigeria (1994).
Most consecutive draws
5,  Belgium, from 0–0 Netherlands (1998) to 1–1 Tunisia (2002).
Most consecutive matches without a draw
16,  Portugal, from 3–1 Hungary (1966) to 1–0 Netherlands (2006).
Most consecutive matches scoring at least one goal
18,  Brazil (1930–1958) and  Germany (1934–1958).
Most consecutive matches scoring at least two goals
11,  Uruguay (1930–1954)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least three / four goals
4,  Uruguay (1930–1950) and  Hungary (1954) (four goals); also  Portugal (1966),  Germany (1970),  Brazil (1970),
Most consecutive matches scoring at least six / eight goals
2,  Hungary (1954) (eight goals); also  Brazil (1950) (six goals)
Most consecutive matches without scoring a goal
5,  Bolivia (1930–1994) and  Algeria (1986–2010).
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (clean sheets)
5,  Italy (1990) and   Switzerland (2006–2010).
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal
559,   Switzerland (1994, 2006–2010).[32][33]
Most consecutive matches conceding at least one goal
22,   Switzerland (1934–1994).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least two goals
9,  Mexico (1930–1958).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least three goals
5,  Mexico (1930–1950).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least four goals
3,  Bolivia (1930–1950),  Mexico (1930–1950).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least five / six / seven goals
2,  South Korea (1954) (seven goals); also  United States (1930–1934) (six goals); also  Austria (1954) (five goals).

Individual

For records regarding goalscoring, see Goalscoring; for records regarding goalkeeping, see Goalkeeping
Most tournaments played
5, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico, 1950–1966) and Lothar Matthäus (Germany Germany, 1982–1998).
See here for a list of players who have appeared in multiple FIFA World Cups
Most championships
3, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958, 1962 (only played in first two matches; medal awarded retroactively by FIFA in 2007[34]) and 1970).
See here for a list of players who have won multiple FIFA World Cups
Most matches played, finals
25, Lothar Matthäus (Germany Germany, 1982–1998).
Most minutes played, finals
2,217 minutes, Paolo Maldini ( Italy, 1990–2002).
Most matches played, qualifying
68, Iván Hurtado ( Ecuador, 1994–2010)
Most matches won
16, Cafu ( Brazil, 1994–2006).
Most appearances in a World Cup final
3, Cafu ( Brazil, 1994, 1998, 2002).[35]
Most finals played with different teams
2, Luis Monti  Argentina (1930),  Italy (1934)
Most appearances as captain
16, Diego Maradona ( Argentina, 1986–1994).
Most appearances as substitute
11, Denílson ( Brazil, 1998–2002).
Youngest player
17 years and 41 days, Norman Whiteside ( Northern Ireland, vs Yugoslavia, 1982).
Youngest player, final
17 years and 249 days, Pele ( Brazil, vs Sweden, 1958).
Youngest player, qualifying match
13 years and 310 days, Souleymane Mamam ( Togo, vs Zambia, 6 May 2001, 2002 CAF Group 1).[36]
Youngest captain
21 years and 109 days, Tony Meola ( United States, vs Czechoslovakia, 10 June 1990).[37]
Oldest player
42 years and 39 days, Roger Milla ( Cameroon, vs Russia, 1994).
Oldest player, final
40 years and 133 days, Dino Zoff ( Italy, vs Germany, 1982).
Oldest player, qualifying match
46 years and 180 days, MacDonald Taylor, Sr. ( U.S. Virgin Islands, vs St. Kitts and Nevis, 18 February 2004, 2006 CONCACAF Prelim Group 4).[38]
Oldest captain
40 years and 292 days, Peter Shilton ( England, vs Italy, 7 July 1990).
Oldest player to debut in a World Cup finals tournament
39 years and 321 days, David James ( England, vs Algeria, 18 June 2010).
Largest age difference on the same team
24 years and 42 days, 1994,  Cameroon (Rigobert Song: 17 years and 358 days; Roger Milla: 42 years and 35 days).
Largest age difference on a champion team
21 years and 297 days, 1982,  Italy (Dino Zoff: 40 years and 133 days; Giuseppe Bergomi: 18 years and 201 days).
Longest period between World Cup finals appearances as a player
12 years and 13 days, Alfred Bickel (  Switzerland, 1938–1950).
Longest span of World Cup finals appearances as a player
16 years, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico, 1950–1966); Elías Figueroa ( Chile, 1966–1982); Hugo Sánchez ( Mexico, 1978–1994); Giuseppe Bergomi ( Italy, 1982–1998); Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, 1982–1998); Rigobert Song ( Cameroon, 1994–2010).
Longest period between World Cup finals appearances, overall
44 years, Tim ( Brazil, 1938, as a player; and  Peru, 1982, as coach).

Goalscoring

Individual

Most goals scored, overall finals
15, Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006).
For a detailed list of the overall top goalscorers, see World Cup overall top goalscorers
Most goals scored, overall qualifying
35, Ali Daei ( Iran, 1994–2006).[39]
Most goals scored in a tournament
13, Just Fontaine ( France), 1958.
For a detailed list of top goalscorers in each tournament (Golden Boot winner), see FIFA World Cup awards#Golden Boot
Most goals scored in a match
5, Oleg Salenko ( Russia, vs Cameroon, 1994).
Most goals scored in a lost match
4, Ernest Wilimowski ( Poland, vs Brazil, 1938).
Most goals scored in a qualifying match
13, Archie Thompson ( Australia, vs American Samoa, 2002 OFC Group 1).
Most goals scored in a final match
3, Geoff Hurst ( England, vs West Germany, 1966).
Most goals scored in all final matches
3, Vavá ( Brazil, 2 vs Sweden in 1958 & 1 vs Czechoslovakia in 1962), Pelé ( Brazil, 2 vs Sweden in 1958 & 1 vs Italy in 1970), Geoff Hurst ( England, 3 vs West Germany in 1966), and Zinedine Zidane ( France, 2 vs Brazil in 1998 & 1 vs Italy in 2006).
Most matches with at least one goal
11, Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006).
Most consecutive matches with at least one goal
6, Just Fontaine ( France, 1958) and Jairzinho ( Brazil, 1970).
Most matches with at least two goals
4, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine ( France, 1958), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010).
Most consecutive matches with at least two goals
4, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954).
Most hat-tricks
2, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine ( France, 1958), Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1970), and Gabriel Batistuta ( Argentina, 1994 and 1998).
Most consecutive hat-tricks
2, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954) and Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1970).
Fastest hat-trick & Most goals scored by a substitute in a match
8 minutes, László Kiss ( Hungary), scored at 69', 72', and 76' against El Salvador, 1982.
Olympic Goals scored in a World Cup
1, Marcos Coll  Colombia vs  Soviet Union, 3 June 1962.
Hat-tricks from the penalty spot
Never occurred in the final tournament. Four times in qualification: Kubilay Türkyilmaz (  Switzerland, vs Faroe Islands, 7 October 2000, 2002 UEFA Group 1); Henrik Larsson ( Sweden, vs Moldova, 6 June 2001, 2002 UEFA Group 4); Ronaldo ( Brazil, vs Argentina, 2 June 2004, 2006 CONMEBOL), Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang ( Gabon, vs Niger, 15 June 2013, 2014 CAF Second Round Group E).
Scoring in every match of a World Cup
György Sárosi ( Hungary), 5 goals in 4 matches (1938), Alcides Ghiggia ( Uruguay), 4 goals in 4 matches (1950), Just Fontaine ( France), 13 goals in 6 matches (1958), Jairzinho ( Brazil), 7 goals in 6 matches (1970).[40]
Most tournaments with scoring on each appearance
2, György Sárosi ( Hungary), 1934–1938 (1 goal/1 match and 5/4).
Most tournaments with at least one goal
4, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958–1970) and Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970).
Most tournaments with at least two goals
4, Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970).
Most tournaments with at least three goals
3, Jürgen Klinsmann ( Germany, 1990–1998), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006), and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010).
Most tournaments with at least four goals
3, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010).
Most tournaments with at least five goals
2, Teófilo Cubillas ( Peru 1970, 1978) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2006).
Longest period between a player's first and last goals
12 years, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958–1970), Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970), Diego Maradona ( Argentina, 1982–1994), Michael Laudrup ( Denmark, 1986–1998), Henrik Larsson ( Sweden, 1994–2006), Sami Al-Jaber ( Saudi Arabia, 1994–2006), and Cuauhtémoc Blanco ( Mexico, 1998–2010).
Youngest goalscorer
17 years and 239 days, Pelé ( Brazil, vs Wales, 1958).
Youngest hat-trick scorer
17 years and 244 days, Pelé ( Brazil, vs France, 1958).
Youngest goalscorer, final
17 years and 249 days, Pelé ( Brazil, vs Sweden, 1958).
Oldest goalscorer
42 years and 39 days, Roger Milla ( Cameroon, vs Russia, 1994).
Oldest hat-trick scorer
33 years and 159 days, Tore Keller ( Sweden, vs Cuba, 1938).[41]
Oldest goalscorer, final
35 years, 263 days, Nils Liedholm ( Sweden, vs Brazil, 1958).
Most penalties scored (excluding during shootouts)
4, Eusébio ( Portugal, 4 in 1966), Rob Rensenbrink ( Netherlands, 4 in 1978) – both records for one tournament – and Gabriel Batistuta ( Argentina, 2 each in 1994 and 1998).
Most penalties missed (excluding during shootouts)
2, Asamoah Gyan ( Ghana, 2006 vs  Czech Republic and 2010 vs  Uruguay).
Fastest goal from kickoff
10.89 seconds, Hakan Şükür (, vs Korea Republic, 29 June 2002, 2002).
For a detailed list of the fastest goals from kickoff, see below
Fastest goal by a substitute
16 seconds, Ebbe Sand (, vs Nigeria, 28 June 1998, 1998).
Fastest goal in a final
90 seconds, Johan Neeskens (, vs West Germany, 7 July 1974).
Fastest goal in a qualifying match
8 seconds, Davide Gualtieri ( San Marino, vs England, 17 November 1993, 1994 UEFA Group 2).
Latest goal from kickoff
121st minute, Alessandro Del Piero ( Italy vs Germany, 4 July 2006).
Latest goal from kickoff in a final
120th minute, Geoff Hurst ( England vs West Germany 1966) (see "they think it's all over").
Latest goal from kickoff, with no goals scored inbetween
119th minute, David Platt ( England vs Belgium, 26 June 1990) and Fabio Grosso ( Italy vs Germany, 4 July 2006).

Team

Biggest margin of victory
9,  Hungary (9) vs  South Korea (0), 1954;  Yugoslavia (9) vs  Zaire (0), 1974;  Hungary (10) vs  El Salvador (1), 1982.
Biggest margin of victory, qualifying match
31,  Australia (31) vs  American Samoa (0), 11 April 2001, 2002 OFC Group 1.
Most goals scored in a match, one team
10,  Hungary, vs El Salvador, 1982.
Most goals scored in a match, both teams
12,  Austria (7) vs   Switzerland (5), 1954.
Highest scoring draw
4–4,  England vs  Belgium (AET), 1954, and  Soviet Union vs  Colombia, 1962.
Largest deficit overcome in a win
3 goals,  Austria, 1954 (coming from 0–3 down to win 7–5 vs   Switzerland) and  Portugal, 1966 (coming from 0–3 down to win 5–3 vs  North Korea).
Largest deficit overcome in a draw
3 goals,  Colombia, 1962 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 4–4 vs  Soviet Union) and  Uruguay, 2002 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 3–3 vs  Senegal).
Most goals scored in extra time, both teams
5,  Italy (3) vs  West Germany (2), 1970.
Most goals scored in a final, one team
5,  Brazil, 1958.
Most goals scored in a final, both teams
7,  Brazil (5) vs.  Sweden (2), 1958.
Fewest goals scored in a final, both teams
0,  Brazil (0) vs.  Italy (0), 1994.
Biggest margin of victory in a final
3,  France (3) vs.  Brazil (0) 1998 and  Brazil (4) vs.  Italy (1), 1970 and  Brazil (5) vs.  Sweden (2), 1958.
Largest deficit overcome in a win in a final
2,  West Germany, 1954 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Hungary).
Most goals in a tournament, one team
27,  Hungary, 1954.
Most individual goalscorers for one team, one match
7,  Yugoslavia, vs  Zaire, 1974 (Dušan Bajević, Dragan Džajić, Ivica Šurjak, Josip Katalinski, Vladislav Bogićević, Branko Oblak, Ilija Petković).
Most individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament
10,  France, 1982 (Gérard Soler, Bernard Genghini, Michel Platini, Didier Six, Maxime Bossis, Alain Giresse, Dominique Rocheteau, Marius Trésor, René Girard, Alain Couriol) and  Italy, 2006 (Andrea Pirlo, Vincenzo Iaquinta, Alberto Gilardino, Marco Materazzi, Filippo Inzaghi, Francesco Totti, Gianluca Zambrotta, Luca Toni, Fabio Grosso, Alessandro Del Piero).
Largest goal difference improvement in consecutive matches
[42] +10:  Turkey (1954) — lost 1–4 to  West Germany, then won 7–0 over  South Korea; and  West Germany (1954) — lost 3–8 to  Hungary, then won 7–2 over  Turkey.
Largest goal difference worsening in consecutive matches
-12:  Sweden (1938) — won 8–0 over  Cuba, then lost 1–5 to  Hungary ;  Turkey (1954) — won 7–0 over  South Korea, then lost 2–7 to  West Germany;  Hungary (1982) — won 10–1 over  El Salvador, then lost 1–4 to  Argentina.

Tournament

Most goals scored in a tournament
171 goals, 1998.
Fewest goals scored in a tournament
70 goals 1930 and 1934.
Most goals per match in a tournament
5.38 goals per match, 1954.
Fewest goals per match in a tournament
2.21 goals per match, 1990.
Most scorers in a tournament
111, 1998.
Most players scoring at least two goals in a tournament
37, 1998.
Most players scoring at least three goals in a tournament
21, 1954.
Most players scoring at least four goals in a tournament
11, 1954.
Most players scoring at least five goals in a tournament
6, 1994Hristo Stoichkov ( Bulgaria), Oleg Salenko ( Russia), Romário ( Brazil), Jürgen Klinsmann ( Germany), Roberto Baggio ( Italy) and Kennet Andersson ( Sweden).
Most players scoring at least six goals in a tournament
4, 1954Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary), Erich Probst ( Austria), Max Morlock ( West Germany) and Josef Hügi (  Switzerland).
Most players scoring at least seven goals in a tournament
2, 1970Gerd Müller ( West Germany) and Jairzinho ( Brazil).

Own goals

Most own goals in a tournament
4 goals, 1954, 1998 & 2006.
Most own goals in a match
2,  United States vs  Portugal, 2002 (Jorge Costa of Portugal and Jeff Agoos of USA).
Scoring for both teams in the same match
Ernie Brandts ( Netherlands, vs Italy, 1978 – own goal in the 18th minute, goal in the 50th minute).

Top scoring teams by tournament

Teams listed in bold won the tournament. Fewer than half of all World Cup tournaments have been won by the highest scoring team.

Total and average goals

Year Teams Matches Goals Top scorer Average goals
1930 13 18 70 8 3.89
1934 16 17 70 5 4.12
1938 15 18 84 7 4.67
1950 15 22 88 9 4.00
1954 16 26 140 11 5.38
1958 16 35 126 13 3.60
1962 16 32 89 4 2.78
1966 16 32 89 9 2.78
1970 16 32 95 10 2.97
1974 16 38 97 7 2.55
1978 16 38 102 6 2.68
1982 24 52 146 6 2.81
1986 24 52 132 6 2.54
1990 24 52 115 6 2.21
1994 24 52 141 6 2.71
1998 32 64 171 6 2.67
2002 32 64 161 8 2.52
2006 32 64 147 5 2.30
2010 32 64 145 5 2.27

Most and fewest in bold.

Goalkeeping

Most clean sheets (matches without conceding)
10, Peter Shilton ( England, 1982–1990) and Fabien Barthez ( France, 1998–2006)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (finals)
517 mins (5 consecutive clean sheets), Walter Zenga ( Italy, 1990)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (qualifying)
921 mins (9 consecutive clean sheets[43]), Richard Wilson ( New Zealand, 1982)
Most goals conceded
25, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico) and Mohamed Al-Deayea ( Saudi Arabia)
Most goals conceded, one tournament
16, Hong Duk-Yung ( South Korea), 1954
Most goals conceded, one match
10, Luis Guevara Mora ( El Salvador), 1982 (vs  Hungary)
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament, champions
2, Fabien Barthez ( France), 1998, Gianluigi Buffon ( Italy, 2006) and Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2010)
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament
0, Pascal Zuberbühler (  Switzerland), 2006[44]
Most penalties saved, one tournament (excluding during shootouts)
2, Jan Tomaszewski ( Poland), 1974 and Brad Friedel ( United States), 2002
Fewest goals conceded, penalty shootouts, one match
0, Oleksandr Shovkovskiy ( Ukraine), 2006 (vs   Switzerland)

Coaching

Most matches coached
25, Helmut Schön ( West Germany, 1966–1978).
Most matches won
16, Helmut Schön ( West Germany, 1966–1978).
Most championships
2, Vittorio Pozzo ( Italy, 1934–1938).
Most tournaments
6, Carlos Alberto Parreira (1982, 1990–1998, 2006, 2010).
Most nations coached
5, Bora Milutinović ( Mexico, 1986;  Costa Rica, 1990;  United States, 1994;  Nigeria, 1998;  China PR, 2002).
Most consecutive tournaments with same team
4, Walter Winterbottom ( England, 1950–1962); Helmut Schön ( West Germany, 1966–1978) (note that Sepp Herberger took Germany/West Germany to four tournaments, (1938, 1954, 1958, 1962) omitting the 1950 competition from which Germany was banned).
Most consecutive wins
11, Luiz Felipe Scolari ( Brazil, 2002, 7 wins;  Portugal, 2006, 4 wins – Portugal "won" its next match, the quarterfinal against England, by penalty kicks, which technically counts as a draw).
Most consecutive matches without a loss
12, Luiz Felipe Scolari ( Brazil, 2002, 7 matches;  Portugal, 2006, 5 matches).
Youngest coach
27 years and 267 days, Juan José Tramutola ( Argentina, 1930)
Oldest coach
71 years and 317 days, Otto Rehhagel ( Greece, 2010)
Quickest substitution made
4th minute, Cesare Maldini, Giuseppe Bergomi for Alessandro Nesta ( Italy, vs Austria, 1998); Sven-Göran Eriksson, Peter Crouch for Michael Owen ( England, vs Sweden, 2006).
Most championship wins as player and head coach
3, Mário Zagallo,  Brazil (1958 & 1962 as player, 1970 as coach)[45]
Most final appearances as player and head coach
5, Mário Zagallo,  Brazil (1958 & 1962 as player, 1970, 1974 & 1998 as coach); Franz Beckenbauer,  West Germany (1966–1974 as player, 1986 & 1990 as coach); Berti Vogts,  West Germany (1970–1978 as player, 1994 & 1998 as coach)
Won tournaments as both player and head coach
Mário Zagallo,  Brazil (1958 & 1962 as player, 1970 as coach); Franz Beckenbauer,  West Germany (1974 as player, 1990 as coach)
Won tournaments as both captain and head coach
Franz Beckenbauer,  West Germany (1974 as captain, 1990 as coach)

Refereeing

Most tournaments
3 – John Langenus (Belgium Belgium, 1930–1938), Ivan Eklind (Sweden Sweden, 1934–1950), Benjamin Griffiths (Wales Wales, 1950–1958), Arthur Ellis (England England, 1950–1958), István Zsolt (Hungary Hungary, 1954–1962), Juan Gardeazábal (Spain Spain, 1958–1966), Arturo Yamasaki Maldonado (Peru Peru, 1962–1970), Ramón Barreto (Uruguay Uruguay, 1970–1978), Nicolae Rainea (Romania Romania, 1974–1982), Erik Fredriksson (Sweden Sweden, 1982–1990), Jamal Al Sharif (Syria Syria, 1986–1994), Joël Quiniou (France France, 1986–1994), Ali Mohamed Bujsaim (United Arab Emirates UAE, 1994–2002), Óscar Ruiz (Colombia Colombia, 2002–2010), Carlos Eugênio Simon (Brazil Brazil, 2002–2010)
Most matches refereed, overall
8 – Joël Quiniou (France France, 1986–1994), Benito Archundia (Mexico Mexico, 2006–2010) and Jorge Larrionda (Uruguay Uruguay, 2006–2010)
Most matches refereed, one tournament
5 – Benito Archundia (Mexico Mexico, 2006), Horacio Elizondo (Argentina Argentina, 2006) and Ravshan Irmatov (Uzbekistan Uzbekistan, 2010)
Youngest referee
24 years and 193 days – Juan Gardeazábal (Spain Spain, 1958)
Oldest referee
53 years and 236 days – George Reader (England England, 1950)

Discipline

Note: There are no official records for cautions issued in tournaments before the introduction of yellow cards in 1970.[46]

Fastest caution
first minute, Giampiero Marini ( Italy), vs  Poland, 1982; Sergei Gorlukovich ( Russia), vs  Sweden, 1994.
Fastest sending off
56 seconds, José Batista ( Uruguay), vs  Scotland, 1986.
Fastest sending off, qualification
37 seconds, Rashed Al Hooti ( Bahrain), vs  Iran, 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification.
Latest caution
during penalty shootout: Edinho ( Brazil) v  France 1986; Carlos Roa ( Argentina), vs  England, 1998.
Latest sending off
after penalty shootout: Leandro Cufré ( Argentina), vs  Germany, 2006 (Cufré was red carded for kicking Per Mertesacker in an altercation following the match).
Sent off from the bench
Claudio Caniggia ( Argentina), vs  Sweden, 2002.
Most cards (all-time, player)
6, Zinedine Zidane ( France, 1998–2006) and Cafu ( Brazil, 1994–2006).
Most cautions (all-time, player)
6, Cafu ( Brazil, 1994–2006).
Most sendings off (all-time, player)
2, Rigobert Song ( Cameroon, 1994 and 1998) and Zinedine Zidane ( France, 1998 and 2006).
Most sendings off (tournament)
28 (in 64 games), 2006.
Most sendings off (all-time, team)
11 (in 97 games),  Brazil
Most sendings off (match, both teams)
4 (2 each) in  Portugal vs  Netherlands, 2006 (also known as Battle of Nuremberg).
Most sendings off (final match)
2, Pedro Monzón & Gustavo Dezotti (both  Argentina), v  West Germany, 1990
Most cautions (tournament)
345 (in 64 matches), 2006.
Most cautions (all-time, team)
88 (in 64 games),  Argentina
Most cautions (match, one team)
9,  Portugal, 2006, vs  Netherlands &  Netherlands, 2010, vs  Spain
Most cautions (match, both teams)
16 –  Portugal vs  Netherlands, 2006;[47] and  Cameroon v  Germany, 11 June 2002[48]
Most cautions (match, player)
3 (61', 90', 93') Josip Šimunić ( Croatia), vs  Australia, 2006 (referee: Graham Poll)[49]
Most cautions (final match, both teams)
14, 5 ( Spain) and 9 ( Netherlands) 2010[50]
Most suspensions (tournament, player)
2, André Kana-Biyik ( Cameroon 1990)[51]
Longest suspension (player, doping)
15 months, Diego Maradona ( Argentina vs  Nigeria, 1994)[52]
Longest suspension (player, misconduct)
Longest suspension, qualifying
Most consecutive matches without a sending off, team
  • 56 matches,  Spain, 1934-2010

Host records

Most times hosted

2,  Mexico 1970 & 1986,  Italy 1934 & 1990,  France 1938 & 1998,  Germany 1974 (as West Germany) & 2006 and  Brazil 1950 & 2014.

# team Host
1  Mexico(1970, 1986) Italy(1934, 1990) France(1938, 1998) Brazil(1950,2014) Germany(1974, 2006) 2
2  Uruguay(1930)  Switzerland(1954) Sweden(1958) Chile(1962) England(1966) Argentina(1978) Spain(1982) United States(1994) South Korea(2002) Japan(2002) South Africa(2010) Russia(2018) Qatar(2022) 1

Best performance by host

Champions, 6 times:  Uruguay 1930,  Italy 1934,  England 1966,  West Germany 1974,  Argentina 1978,  France 1998

# Performance Team Pld W D L Win% GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
1 Champion  Uruguay (1930) 4 4 0 0 100 15 3 12 3 3.8
2 Champion  France (1998) 7 6 1 0 85.7 15 2 13 1.9 2.1
3 Champion  Germany (1974) 7 6 0 1 85.7 13 4 9 1.3 1.9
4 Champion  England (1966) 6 5 1 0 83.3 11 3 8 1.3 1.8
5 Champion  Italy (1934) 5 4 1 0 80 12 3 9 1.8 2.4
6 Champion  Argentina (1978) 7 5 1 1 71.4 15 4 9 1.3 2.1
7 Runners-up  Brazil (1950) 6 4 1 1 66.7 22 6 16 2.7 3.7
8 Runners-up  Sweden (1958) 6 4 1 1 66.7 12 7 5 0.8 2
9 Third place  Italy (1990) 7 6 1 0 85.7 10 2 8 1.1 1.4
10 Third place  Germany (2006) 7 5 1 1 71.4 14 6 8 1.1 2
11 Third place  Chile (1962) 6 4 0 2 66.7 10 8 2 0.33 1.3
12 Fourth place  South Korea (2002) 7 3 2 2 42.8 8 6 2 0.3 1.1
13 Quarter-final  Mexico (1986) 5 3 2 0 60 6 2 4 0.8 1.2
14 Quarter-final  Mexico (1970) 4 2 1 1 50 6 4 0.5 0.8 1.5
15 Quarter-final   Switzerland (1954) 4 2 0 2 50 11 11 0 0 2.8
16 Quarter-final  France (1938) 2 1 0 1 50 4 4 0 0 2
17 Second Round  Spain (1982) 5 1 2 2 20 4 5 −1 −0.2 0.8
18 Round of 16  Japan (2002) 4 2 1 1 50 5 3 2 0.5 1.0
19 Round of 16  United States (1994) 4 1 1 2 25 3 4 −1 −0.3 0.8
20 Group stage  South Africa (2010) 3 1 1 1 33.3 3 5 −2 −0.7 1

Worst performance by host

 South Africa in 2010 became the first host to be eliminated in the first round.[57] Two other hosts:  United States in 1994 and  Spain in 1982 both reached the second round but finished with a worse overall W–D–L record than  South Africa's, 1–1–1. However,  South Africa had a worse goal difference of −2 and both  United States and  Spain finished the first round with a goal difference of 0.

Attendance

Highest attendance in a match
199,854, Uruguay v Brazil, 16 July 1950, Maracanã Stadium, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, World Cup 1950.
Highest attendance in a final
114,600, Argentina v West Germany, 29 June 1986, Estadio Azteca, Mexico City, Mexico, World Cup 1986.
Lowest attendance in a match
300, Romania vs Peru, 14 July 1930, Estadio Pocitos, Montevideo, Uruguay, World Cup 1930.
Highest attendance in a qualifying match
162,764, Brazil vs Colombia, 9 March 1977, Maracanã Stadium, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1978 CONMEBOL Group 1.
Lowest attendance in a qualifying match
0, Costa Rica vs Panama, 26 March 2005, Estadio Ricardo Saprissa, San Juan de Tibás, San José, Costa Rica, 2006 CONCACAF Final Group.[58][59]
Highest average of attendance per match
68,991, 1994.
Highest attendance in a tournament
3,570,000, 1994.
Lowest average of attendance per match
23,235, 1934.
Lowest attendance in a tournament
390,000, 1934.

Total and average attendance

Year Matches Attendance Lowest match attendance Highest match attendance Avg Attendance
1930 18 434,500  Romania Peru Round 1 300  Uruguay Argentina Final 93,000 24,139
1934 17 358,000  Czechoslovakia Romania Round 1 8,000  Czechoslovakia Romania Semi-finals 60,000 21,059
1938 18 483,000  Sweden Cuba Quarterfinals 6,846  France Italy Quarterfinals 58,455 26,833
1950 22 1,043,500   Switzerland Mexico Round 1 4,000  Uruguay Brazil Final 199,854 47,432
1954 26 889,500  Turkey South Korea Round 1 3,000  Hungary West Germany Round 1 65,000 34,212
1958 35 919,580  Northern Ireland Czechoslovakia Round 1 6,196  Sweden Brazil Final 51,800 26,274
1962 32 899,074  England Bulgaria Round 1 5,700  Brazil Chile Semi-finals 76,500 28,096
1966 32 1,635,000  Chile North Korea Round 1 16,000  England France Round 1 98,270 51,094
1970 32 1,603,975  Israel Sweden Round 1 10,000  Brazil Italy Final 107,412 50,127
1974 38 1,774,022  East Germany Australia Round 1 10,000  West Germany Chile Round 1 83,168 46,685
1978 38 1,546,151  Poland Tunisia Round 1 9,624  Argentina Italy Round 1 71,712 40,688
1982 52 2,109,723  Peru Cameroon Round 1 11,000  Argentina Belgium Round 1 95,500 40,572
1986 52 2,393,031  Hungary Canada/ Round 1 13,800  Argentina West Germany Final 114,600 46,020
1990 52 2,516,348  Yugoslavia United Arab Emirates Round 1 27,833  West Germany Yugoslavia Round 1 74,765 48,391
1994 52 3,587,538  Netherlands Saudi Arabia Round 1 50,535  Brazil Italy Final 94,194 68,991
1998 64 2,785,100  Paraguay Bulgaria Round 1 27,650  Brazil France Final 80,000 43,517
2002 64 2,705,197  Spain Paraguay Round 1 24,000  Germany Brazil Final 69,029 42,269
2006 64 3,359,439  Iran Angola Round 1 38,000  Germany Argentina Quarterfinals 72,000 52,491
2010 64 3,178,856  New Zealand Slovakia Round 1 23,871  Netherlands Spain Final 84,490 49,670

Penalty shootouts

Most shootouts, team, all-time
4,  Argentina,  France,  Germany and  Italy
Most shootouts, team, tournament
2,  Argentina 1990 and  Spain 2002
Most shootouts, all teams, tournament
4, 1990, 2006
Most wins, team, all-time
4,  Germany
Most wins, team, tournament
2,  Argentina 1990
Most losses, team, all-time
3,  Italy and  England
Most shootouts with 100% record (all won)
4,  Germany[60]
Most shootouts with 0% record (all lost)
3,  England[61]
Most shootouts, kicker, all-time & Most losses, kicker, all-time
3, Roberto Baggio,  Italy (1990 semi-final, 1994 final, 1998 quarter final)
Most successful kicks, shootout, one team
5,  West Germany 1982,  Belgium 1986,  Republic of Ireland 1990,  Sweden 1994,  South Korea 2002,  Italy 2006,  Paraguay 2010
Most successful kicks, shootout, both teams
9, (in 5 matches)
Most successful kicks, team, all-time
17,  West Germany
Most kicks taken, shootout, both teams
12,  West Germany vs  France 1982 and  Sweden vs  Romania 1994
Most kicks taken, team, all-time
20,  France and  Italy
Most kicks taken, team, one tournament
9,  Argentina 1990 and  Spain 2002
Most kicks missed, shootout, both teams
5,  Argentina vs  Yugoslavia 1990,  Spain vs  Republic of Ireland 2002 and  Portugal vs  England 2006
Most kicks missed, team, all-time
7,  England (in 3 shootouts) and  Italy (in 4 shootouts)
Fewest successful kicks, shootout, one team
0,   Switzerland 2006 vs  Ukraine
Most saves, all-time
4, Sergio Goycochea  Argentina and Harald Schumacher  Germany
Most saves, tournament
4, Sergio Goycochea  Argentina, 1990.
Most saves, shootout
3, Ricardo  Portugal, vs  England, 2006.

References and footnotes

External links

  • FIFA World Cup superlatives – FIFA (PDF)
  • Largest Margins of Victory – FIFA (PDF)
  • Largest Crowds – FIFA (PDF)
  • The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation (RSSSF)
  • (German) Worldcupportal.de – records
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