World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Ford Madox Ford

Ford Madox Ford
Born (1873-12-17)17 December 1873
Merton, Surrey, England
Died 26 June 1939(1939-06-26) (aged 65)
Deauville, France
Pen name Ford Hermann Hueffer, Ford Madox Hueffer
Occupation Novelist, and publisher
Nationality British
Period 1892–1939

Ford Madox Ford (17 December 1873 – 26 June 1939), born Ford Hermann Hueffer ( ),[1] was an English novelist, poet, critic and editor whose journals, The English Review and The Transatlantic Review, were instrumental in the development of early 20th-century English literature. He is now remembered best for his publications The Good Soldier (1915), the Parade's End tetralogy (1924–28) and The Fifth Queen trilogy (1906–08). The Good Soldier is frequently included among the great literature of the 20th century, including the Modern Library 100 Best Novels,[2] The Observer's "100 Greatest Novels of All Time",[3] and The Guardian's "1000 novels everyone must read".[4]

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Literary life 2
  • Promotion of literature 3
  • Selected works 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6
  • External links 7

Biography

Ford was born in Wimbledon[5] to Catherine Madox Brown and Francis Hueffer, the eldest of three; his brother was Oliver Madox Hueffer. His father, who became music critic for The Times, was German and his mother English. His paternal grandfather Johann Hermann Hüffer was first to publish the fellow Westphalian poet and author Annette von Droste-Hülshoff, a Catholic aristocrat. He used the name of Ford Madox Hueffer and in 1919 changed it to Ford Madox Ford (allegedly, in the aftermath of World War I because "Hueffer" sounded too German[6]) in honour of his grandfather, the Pre-Raphaelite painter Ford Madox Brown, whose biography he had written. In 1894 he married his school girlfriend Elsie Martindale and together they had two daughters, Christina (born 1897) and Katharine (born 1900).[7] Between 1918 and 1927 he lived with Stella Bowen, an Australian artist twenty years his junior. In 1920 they had a daughter, Julia Madox Ford.[8] Ford spent the last years of his life teaching at Olivet College in Michigan, and died in Deauville, France, at the age of 65.

Literary life

One of his most famous works is The Good Soldier (1915), a novel set just before World War I which chronicles the tragic lives of two "perfect couples" using intricate flashbacks. In the "Dedicatory Letter to Stella Ford”, that prefaces the novel, Ford reports that a friend pronounced The Good Soldier “the finest French novel in the English language!” Ford pronounced himself a "Tory mad about historic continuity" and believed the novelist's function was to serve as the historian of his own time.[9]

Ford was involved in British war propaganda after the beginning of World War I. He worked for the War Propaganda Bureau, managed by C. F. G. Masterman, with other writers and scholars who were popular during that time, such as Arnold Bennett, G. K. Chesterton, John Galsworthy, Hilaire Belloc and Gilbert Murray. Ford wrote two propaganda books for Masterman, namely When Blood is Their Argument: An Analysis of Prussian Culture (1915), with the help of Richard Aldington, and Between St Dennis and St George: A Sketch of Three Civilizations (1915).

After writing the two propaganda books, Ford enlisted at 41 years of age into the Welch Regiment on 30 July 1915, and was sent to France, thus ending his cooperation with the War Propaganda Bureau. His combat experiences and his previous propaganda activities inspired his tetralogy Parade's End (1924–1928), set in England and on the Western Front before, during and after World War I.

Ford also wrote dozens of novels as well as essays, poetry, memoirs and literary criticism, and collaborated with Joseph Conrad on three novels, The Inheritors (1901), Romance (1903) and The Nature of a Crime (1924, although written much earlier). During the three to five years after this direct collaboration, Ford's best known achievement was The Fifth Queen trilogy (1906–1908), historical novels based on the life of Katharine Howard, which Conrad termed, at the time, "the swan song of historical romance."[10] His poem, Antwerp (1915), was praised by T.S. Eliot as "the only good poem I have met with on the subject of the war".[11]

Ford's novel Ladies Whose Bright Eyes (1911, extensively revised in 1935)[12] is, in a sense, the reverse of Twain's novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.

Promotion of literature

In 1908, he founded Witness to a Century,[14] describes Ford's recollection of his writing collaboration with Joseph Conrad, and the lack of acknowledgment by publishers of his status as co-author. Seldes recounts Ford's disappointment with Hemingway: "'and he disowns me now that he has become better known than I am.' Tears now came to Ford's eyes." Ford says, "I helped Joseph Conrad, I helped Hemingway. I helped a dozen, a score of writers, and many of them have beaten me. I'm now an old man and I'll die without making a name like Hemingway." Seldes observes, "At this climax Ford began to sob. Then he began to cry."

Hemingway devoted a chapter of his Parisian memoir A Moveable Feast to an encounter with Ford at a café in Paris during the early 1920s.

During a later sojourn in the United States, he was involved with Allen Tate, Caroline Gordon, Katherine Anne Porter and Robert Lowell (who was then a student). Ford was always a champion of new literature and literary experimentation. In 1929, he published The English Novel: From the Earliest Days to the Death of Joseph Conrad, a brisk and accessible overview of the history of English novels. He had an affair with Jean Rhys, which ended acrimoniously.[15]

Selected works

  • The Shifting of the Fire, as H Ford Hueffer, Unwin, 1892.
  • The Brown Owl, as H Ford Hueffer, Unwin, 1892.
  • The Queen Who Flew: A Fairy Tale, Bliss Sands & Foster, 1894.
  • The Cinque Ports, Blackwood, 1900.
  • The Inheritors: An Extravagant Story, Joseph Conrad and Ford M. Hueffer, Heinemann, 1901.
  • Rossetti, Duckworth, [1902].
  • Romance, Joseph Conrad and Ford M. Hueffer, Smith Elder, 1903.
  • The Benefactor, Langham, 1905.
  • The Soul of London, Alston Rivers, 1905.
  • The Heart of the Country, Duckworth, 1906.
  • The Fifth Queen (Part One of The Fifth Queen trilogy), Alston Rivers, 1906.
  • Privy Seal (Part Two of The Fifth Queen trilogy), Alston Rivers, 1907.
  • An English Girl, Methuen, 1907.
  • The Fifth Queen Crowned (Part Three of The Fifth Queen trilogy), Nash, 1908.
  • Mr Apollo, Methuen, 1908.
  • The Half Moon, Nash, 1909.
  • A Call, Chatto, 1910.
  • The Portrait, Methuen, 1910.
  • The Critical Attitude, as Ford Madox Hueffer, Duckworth 1911.
  • The Simple Life Limited, as Daniel Chaucer, Lane, 1911.
  • Ladies Whose Bright Eyes, Constable, 1911 (extensively revised in 1935).
  • The Panel, Constable, 1912.
  • The New Humpty Dumpty, as Daniel Chaucer, Lane, 1912.
  • Henry James, Secker, 1913.
  • Mr Fleight, Latimer, 1913.
  • The Young Lovell, Chatto, 1913.
  • Antwerp (eight-page poem), The Poetry Bookshop, 1915.
  • Henry James, A Critical Study (1915).
  • Between St Dennis and St George, Hodder, 1915.
  • The Good Soldier, Lane, 1915.
  • Zeppelin Nights, with Violet Hunt, Lane, 1915.
  • The Marsden Case, Duckworth, 1923.
  • Women and Men, Paris, 1923.
  • Mr Bosphorous, Duckworth, 1923.
  • The Nature of a Crime, with Joseph Conrad, Duckworth, 1924.
  • Joseph Conrad, A Personal Remembrance, Little, Brown and Company, 1924.
  • Some Do Not . . ., Duckworth, 1924.
  • No More Parades, Duckworth, 1925.
  • A Man Could Stand Up --, Duckworth, 1926.
  • New York is Not America, Duckworth, 1927.
  • New York Essays, Rudge, 1927.
  • New Poems, Rudge, 1927.
  • Last Post, Duckworth, 1928.
  • A Little Less Than Gods, Duckworth, [1928].
  • No Enemy, Macaulay, 1929.
  • The English Novel: From the Earliest Days to the Death of Joseph Conrad (One Hour Series), Lippincott, 1929.
  • The English Novel, Constable, 1930.
  • Return to Yesterday, Liveright, 1932.
  • When the Wicked Man, Cape, 1932.
  • The Rash Act, Cape, 1933.
  • It Was the Nightingale, Lippincott, 1933.
  • Henry for Hugh, Lippincott, 1934.
  • Provence, Unwin, 1935.
  • Ladies Whose Bright Eyes (revised version), 1935
  • Portraits from Life: Memories and Criticism of Henry James, Joseph Conrad, Thomas Hardy, H.G.Wells, Stephen Crane, D.H.Lawrence, John Galsworthy, Ivan Turgenev, W.H. Hudson, Theodore Dreiser, A.C. Swinburne, Houghton Mifflin Company Boston, 1937
  • Great Trade Route, OUP, 1937.
  • Vive Le Roy, Unwin, 1937.
  • The March of Literature, Dial, 1938.
  • Selected Poems, Randall, 1971.
  • Your Mirror to My Times, Holt, 1971.

References

  1. ^ Daniel Jones, Everyman's English Pronouncing Dictionary, 13th ed. (rev. A.C. Gimson; London: Dent, 1967), p. 236.
  2. ^ Modern Library, "100 Best Novels", 20 July 1998
  3. ^ LibraryThing, "Book awards: The Observer's 100 Greatest Novels of All Time"
  4. ^ The Guardian, "1000 novels everyone must read", guardian.co.uk, Friday 23 January 2009
  5. ^ "Complete Works of Ford Madox Ford, with picture of birthplace in Kingston Road, Wimbledon.". ,. Retrieved 3 Feb 2014. 
  6. ^ Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast.
  7. ^ "Ford Madox Ford Society Biography". 
  8. ^ The Saddest Story. A Mizener. 1971.
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Judd, Alan (1991). Ford Madox Ford. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. p. 157. 
  11. ^ Lewis, Pericles. "Antwerp". 
  12. ^ Richard A. Cassell, "The Two Sorrells of Ford Madox Ford", in Modern Philology, Vol. 59, No. 2, November 1961, pp. 114–121 [2]
  13. ^ Lindberg-Seyersted B., Pound/Ford, the story of a literary friendship: the correspondence between Ezra Pound and Ford Madox Ford and their writings about each other, edited by Brita Lindberg-Seyersted, New Directions Publishing, 1982. ISBN 978-0-8112-0833-8
  14. ^ Seldes, George (1987), Witness to a Century, Ballantine Books, pp.258-259. ISBN 0-345-35329-3
  15. ^ Jean Rhys

Further reading

  • Attridge, John, "Steadily and Whole: Ford Madox Ford and Modernist Sociology," in Modernism/modernity 15:2 ([3] April 2008), 297–315.
  • Carpenter, Humphrey (1987). Geniuses Together: American Writers in Paris in the 1920s. Unwin Hyman.   Contains a sharp, critical biographical sketch of Ford.
  • Hawkes, Rob, Ford Madox Ford and the Misfit Moderns: Edwardian Fiction and the First World War. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. ISBN 978-0230301535
  • Judd, Alan, Ford Madox Ford. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1991.
  • Saunders, Max, Ford Madox Ford: A Dual Life, 2 vols. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1996. ISBN 0-19-211789-0 and ISBN 0-19-212608-3
  • Thirlwell, Angela, Into the Frame: The Four Loves of Ford Madox Brown. London, Chatto & Windus, 2010. ISBN 978-0-7011-7902-1

External links

  • Ford Madox Ford Society
  • A biography of Ford
  • Literary Encyclopedia entry on Ford
  • Works by Ford Madox Ford at Project Gutenberg
  • The Good Soldier complete
  • LitWeb.net: Ford Madox Ford Biography
  • International Ford Madox Ford Studies
  • The Ford Madox Ford Papers at Washington University in St. Louis
  • Notable Names Database NNDB entry, listing family members, lovers, descendents (three daughters)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.