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Franklin D. Roosevelt Supreme Court candidates

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Title: Franklin D. Roosevelt Supreme Court candidates  
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Subject: List of federal judges appointed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Warren G. Harding Supreme Court candidates, Herbert Hoover Supreme Court candidates, Cullen–Harrison Act
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Franklin D. Roosevelt Supreme Court candidates

During his twelve years in office, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed eight new members of the Supreme Court of the United States: Associate Justices Hugo Black, Stanley F. Reed, Felix Frankfurter, William O. Douglas, Frank Murphy, James F. Byrnes, Robert H. Jackson, and Wiley Blount Rutledge. Additionally, he elevated sitting Justice Harlan Fiske Stone to Chief Justice. Roosevelt's nine nominations filled eight seats on the Supreme Court because Associate Justice Byrnes resigned while Roosevelt was still in office. Roosevelt nominated Rutledge to the seat vacated by Byrnes.

Hugo Black nomination

One of Roosevelt's most severe political defeats during his presidency was the failure of the [1] Soon after this setback, however, Roosevelt obtained his first opportunity to appoint a Supreme Court Justice when conservative Willis Van Devanter retired. Roosevelt wanted the replacement to be a "thumping, evangelical New Dealer" who was reasonably young, confirmable by the Senate, and from a region of the country unrepresented on the Court.[2] The three final candidates were Solicitor General Stanley Reed, Indiana Senator Sherman Minton, and Alabama Senator Hugo Black.[3] Roosevelt said Reed "had no fire," and Minton didn't want the appointment at the time.[3] Black was a candidate from the South who as a senator had voted for all twenty-four of Roosevelt's major New Deal programs,[3] and had been an outspoken advocate of the court-packing plan. Roosevelt admired Black's use of the investigative role of the Senate to shape the American mind on reforms, his strong voting record, and his early support, which dated back to 1933.[4]

On August 12, 1937, Roosevelt nominated Black to fill the vacancy. For the first time since 1853, the Senate departed from its tradition, which had been to confirm the appointment of a sitting Senator without debate.[5] Instead, it referred the nomination to the Judiciary Committee.[5] Black was criticized by other senators and Newsweek for his presumed bigotry, his cultural roots, and later when it became public, his Klan membership,[6] but the Committee recommended Black's confirmation by a vote of 13–4 on August 16.[7]

The next day the full Senate considered Black's nomination.[5] Rumors relating to Black's involvement in the Ku Klux Klan surfaced among the senators,[6] and Democratic Senators Royal S. Copeland and Edward R. Burke urged the Senate to defeat the nomination. However, no conclusive evidence of Black's involvement was available at the time, so after six hours of debate, the Senate voted 63-16 to confirm Black[8] - ten Republicans and six Democrats voted against Black.[6] He resigned from the Senate and was sworn in as an Associate Justice two days later; Black would later explain that the haste in resigning was to avoid fallout from his Klan membership potentially going public.[9]

Stanley Reed nomination

On January 5, 1938, 78-year-old Associate Justice Stanley F. Reed, who had been considered for the previous vacancy. Many in the nation's capital worried about the nomination fight, in light of the difficulty encountered by Hugo Black. However, Reed's nomination was swift and generated little debate in the Senate. He was confirmed on January 25, 1938 by voice vote, and seated as an Associate Justice on January 31.[10] As of 2010, Reed was the last person to serve as a Supreme Court Justice without possessing a law degree.[11]

Felix Frankfurter nomination

Following the death of Supreme Court Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo in July 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked his old friend Felix Frankfurter for recommendations of prospective candidates for the vacancy. Finding none on the list to suit his criteria, Roosevelt nominated Frankfurter himself on January 5, 1939.[12] Frankfurter was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 17, 1939 by voice vote.[8]

William O. Douglas nomination

In 1939, Justice Louis D. Brandeis resigned from the Supreme Court, and Roosevelt nominated Douglas as his replacement on March 20, 1939.[13] Douglas later revealed that this had been a great surprise to him—Roosevelt had summoned him to an "important meeting," and Douglas feared that he was to be named as the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 4 by a vote of 62 to 4. The four negative votes were cast by four Republicans: Lynn J. Frazier, Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., Gerald P. Nye, and Clyde M. Reed. Douglas was sworn into office on April 17, 1939.

Frank Murphy nomination

Justice Pierce Butler died in 1939, creating the next vacancy on the Court. Butler was a Catholic, and held a seat traditionally filled by a Catholic justice. On January 4, 1940, Roosevelt maintained the tradition of a Catholic seat when he nominated Frank Murphy. Murphy was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 16, 1940 by voice vote.[8]

Harlan Fiske Stone, James Byrnes, and Robert H. Jackson nominations

On January 31, 1941, James Clark McReynolds, soon to be 80 years old, resigned from the Court, followed within a few months by the resignation of Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, also nearly 80. On June 12, 1941, Roosevelt nominated Associate Justice Harlan Fiske Stone to be Chief Justice. That same day, Roosevelt also nominated James F. Byrnes, and Robert H. Jackson to the Court, with Byrnes to succeed McReynolds and Jackson to fill the Associate Justice seat to be vacated be the elevation of Stone. Byrnes was confirmed by the United States Senate on the same day by voice vote.[8] Stone was confirmed on June 27, 1941 and Jackson on July 7, 1941, both also by voice vote.[8]

Wiley Blount Rutledge nomination

Byrnes only served on the Court for a year and a half, resigning at Roosevelt's behest to head the powerful Office of Economic Stabilization. On January 11, 1943, Roosevelt nominated Wiley Blount Rutledge to fill the vacancy. Rutledge was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 8, 1943 by voice vote.[8]

Names mentioned

Following is a list of individuals who were mentioned in various news accounts and books as having been considered by Roosevelt for a Supreme Court appointment:

United States Supreme Court (elevation to Chief Justice)

United States Courts of Appeals

Courts of Appeals

State Supreme Courts

Executive Branch officials

United States Senators

Academics

See also

References

  1. ^ Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Pages 90-91.
  2. ^ Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Page 90.
  3. ^ a b c d Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Page 91.
  4. ^ Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Page 92.
  5. ^ a b c Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Page 94.
  6. ^ a b c Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Pages 94-95.
  7. ^ Van Der Veer, Virginia. "Hugo Black and the KKK."
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-present, senate.gov.
  9. ^ Ball, Howard. Hugo L. Black: Cold Steel Warrior. Oxford University Press. 2006. ISBN 0-19-507814-4. Page 95.
  10. ^ Wood, "Sutherland Quits Supreme Court," New York Times, January 6, 1938; "Stanley Reed Goes to Supreme Court," New York Times, January 16, 1938; "Jackson Is Named Solicitor General," New York Times, January 28, 1938; "High Court Holds Challenge of NLRB Must Await Board Order Against Company," New York Times, February 1, 1938.
  11. ^ "Senate Quickly Confirms Reed Nomination," New York Times, January 26, 1938.
  12. ^ Irons 1999, pp. 327–8
  13. ^ Christopher L. Tomlins (2005). The United States Supreme Court.  
  14. ^ Newman, Roger K. Hugo Black: A Biography. Fordham University Press. p. 338.  
  15. ^ a b c d e Newman, Roger K. Hugo Black: A Biography. Fordham University Press. pp. 233–234.  
  16. ^ a b JUDICIARY: Oyez, Oyez, Oyez, TIME Magazine (October 15, 1934).
  17. ^ Slum Prevention, TIME Magazine (October 10, 1938).
  18. ^ Newman, Roger K. Hugo Black: A Biography. Fordham University Press. p. 214.  
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