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Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative

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Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative

Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative
European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform
Keywords fuel cells, hydrogen economy
Funding Agency "Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking"
Project Type Joint Technology Initiative (JTI)
Reference EC 521/2008[1]
Objective accelerate EU research into hydrogen energy and fuel cell technologies
Participants

European Commission, and private sector represented by a non-profit 'JTI Industry Grouping'

Budget Total: € 970 million (2 x € 470 million)[2]

Funding: Up to € 470 million from the EC, matching funds from private industry.[2]

Duration 2008 - 2017
Web Site http://www.fch-ju.eu/

The European Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative[3][4] is a public-private venture to "deliver 'fit-for-use' hydrogen energy and fuel cell technologies developed to the point of commercial take-off".[5]

The Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative is a component of the Joint Technology Initiatives of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Membership and structure 2
  • Publications 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

In May 2003, a European Commission High Level Group presented a report on "Hydrogen Energy and Fuel Cells — a vision of our future" that recommended the formation of a technology partnership between the Commission and private enterprise for the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The report also recommended the establishment of a pilot programme, with European Commission funding, to make hydrogen and fuel cell technologies commercially viable.

In November of the same year, the EC adopted its "European Initiative for Growth" program that established a Hydrogen economy quick-start project with a budget of 2.8 billion Euros for the decade 2004 through 2015. The initiative allowed for possible funding from structural funds and from the EC's 'Research, Technological development and Demonstration Framework Programmes'. The initiative placed an emphasis on long-term research and cooperation with advisory boards.

In December 2003, the Commission facilitated the establishment of a 'European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform' that sought to bring together interested partners in a joint venture that would further what the High Level Group had envisioned seven months earlier.

In March 2005, the 'European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform' adopted a research agenda for accelerating the development and market introduction of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies within the European Community. This agenda called for funding by the EC and organisations from the public- and private sectors.

On 19 December 2006, the agenda of the Technology Platform were adopted by the Council Decision 2006/975/EC within the EC's Seventh Framework Programme. The prospect of further financing from the European Investment Bank (in particular through its Risk-Sharing Finance Facility) had been established in an earlier decision (2006/971/EC).

In March 2007 the European Council concluded that the Union's member states had an interest in taking a lead position in renewable energy programs. On 10 October 2007, the European Commission adopted two proposals to further the development and marketing of clean and safe hydrogen vehicles. One proposal was to simplify the regulatory procedures for hydrogen-powered vehicles. The other proposal was the establishment up of the 'Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative' as called for by the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform.[6]

The Commission's second proposal was duly considered by the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers, and on 30 May 2008 the Council passed regulation number 521/2008 setting up the "Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking" that will run until 31 December 2017. Article 2 of the regulation stipulated a contribution to the implementation of the Seventh Framework Programme, in particular to its energy-, nanotechnologies-, environment-, and transport-specific programmes. The "Joint Technology Initiative on Fuel Cells and Hydrogen" would accordingly receive appropriations in the general budget of the European Union allocated to those programmes. Article 5 established a maximum community contribution cap of € 470 million. The objectives of the fuel cell initiative were to be pursued by pooling resources from the public and private sectors.

The 'Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative' was launched on 14 October 2008[7] during the General Assembly of Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Stakeholders. A press release from the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform reiterates an estimate "that the activities of the JTI will reduce time to market for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies by between 2 and 5 years."[8]

Membership and structure

The public-private joint initiative operates under the auspices of the DG Research of the European Commission, representing the European Communities, and industry.[1]

Governance of the 'Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative' (FCH JTI) lies with the 'Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking'. Members of that body are the European Community and the 'JTI Industry Grouping', with the latter being "a not-for-profit organisation which brings the sector's industrial key players and which is open to any private legal entity sharing the objectives of the FCH JTI."[2]

As of December 2008, the chairman of the governing board is Gijs van Breda Vriesman of Shell Hydrogen.

The next program will be Horizon 2020, the new framework for Research and Development for the period 2014-2020.[9][10]

Publications

The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform publishes a quarterly newsletter, back-issues of which used to be available online.

References

  1. ^ a b Vizjak, A., ed. (30 May 2008), European Community Council Regulations No 521/2008, Brussels: europa.eu .
  2. ^ a b c Haner, Bengt, ed. (2008), Factsheet: Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative, Brussels: europa.eu .
  3. ^ Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative 3rd FCH JU Stakeholders General Assembly
  4. ^ Hydrogen technology roadmap
  5. ^ Haner, Bengt, ed. (10 October 2007), Commission promotes take-up of hydrogen cars and the development of hydrogen technologies, (Press release) .
  6. ^ Commission promotes take-up of hydrogen cars and the development of hydrogen technologies, (Press release), Brussels: europa.eu, 10 October 2007 .
  7. ^ van Breda Vriesman, Gijs (14 October 2008), Official launch of the FCH JU, Brussels: hfpeurope.org .
  8. ^ Ray, Catherine, ed. (14 October 2008), Developing New Energy for the future: Europe launches a 1 billion Euro project to get into pole position for the Fuel cells and Hydrogen race, (Press release), Brussels: hfpeurope.org .
  9. ^ Public consultation on the preparation of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative under Horizon 2020 is now open
  10. ^ Consultation on the preparation of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Technology Initiative under Horizon 2020

External links

  • NEW IG Homepage
  • FCH Homepage
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