World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Glenn Scobey Warner

Article Id: WHEBN0002122783
Reproduction Date:

Title: Glenn Scobey Warner  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Pittsburgh/On this day, College football national championships in NCAA Division I FBS, Andrew Kerr, Albert Sharpe (American football), American football in Western Pennsylvania
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Glenn Scobey Warner

Glenn Scobey "Pop" Warner
Warner during the 1917 season at Pittsburgh
Sport(s) Football, baseball
Biographical details
Born (1871-04-05)April 5, 1871
Springville, New York
Died September 7, 1954(1954-09-07) (aged 83)
Palo Alto, California
Playing career
Football
1892–1894
1902

Cornell
Syracuse Athletic Club
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1895–1896
1895–1899
1897–1898
1899–1903
1904–1906
1907–1914
1915–1923
1924–1932
1933–1938
1939

Baseball
1905–1906

Georgia
Iowa State
Cornell
Carlisle Indian
Cornell
Carlisle Indian
Pittsburgh
Stanford
Temple
San Jose State (associate)


Cornell
Head coaching record
Overall 319–106–32 (football)[n 1]
36–15 (baseball)
Bowls 1–1–2
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4 National (1915, 1916, 1918, 1926)
1 SIAA (1896)
3 PCC (1924, 1926, 1927)
Awards
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1948)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1951 (profile)

Glenn Scobey Warner (April 5, 1871 – September 7, 1954), most commonly known as Pop Warner, was an Pop Warner Little Scholars.

Early life and playing career

1892 Cornell varsity football team: Warner is the 4th from the left in the middle row.

Warner was born in Springville, New York. He attended and played football for Cornell University. As captain of the Cornell football team, Warner obtained the nickname "Pop" because he was older than most of his teammates. After graduating from Cornell, he had a brief legal career in New York. Warner married Lorraine Tibb, 1888 graduate of Ten Broeck Academy in the Town of Franklinville. In 1902, Warner played pro football for the Syracuse Athletic Club during the first World Series of Football, held at Madison Square Garden. It was during this event, that Warner played in the very first professional indoor football game as his Syracuse squad upset the heavily favored "New York" team. During the Series, Warner was cut badly on the side of his head. While he laughed it off at the time, he was replaced for the rest of the Series, by Blondy Wallace.[1]

Coaching career

Warner from the 1921 Pitt yearbook

Warner was hired by the North Carolina and Vanderbilt. Warner's first Georgia team had three wins against four losses.

The following year Georgia rehired Warner and the team had an undefeated season. While at Georgia, Warner also served as a head coach and then co-coach at [5] Warner's Iowa State record was 18–8, bringing Warner's total lifetime record to 337–114–32.[n 1]

After his stint in Georgia, Warner returned to Cornell to coach football for two seasons. He then coached at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania from 1899 to 1903, returned to Cornell for three seasons, and returned again to Carlisle in 1907. During his second tenure at Carlisle, Warner coached one of the most famous American athletes, Jim Thorpe.

Warner was hired by the University of Pittsburgh in 1914. He coached his teams to 33 straight major wins and has been credited with three national championships (1915, 1916 and 1918.)[6] He coached Pittsburgh from 1915 to 1923, compiling a record of 60–12–4.[7] One of Warner's players, Jock Sutherland, would succeed him as the head coach at Pitt.

The next team Warner coached was at Stanford University from 1924 to 1932, where his teams played in three Rose Bowl games, including the classic 1925 Rose Bowl game against Knute Rockne and the Four Horsemen of Notre Dame. Warner added a fourth national championship in 1926.[6]

Warner's final head coaching job was at Temple University where he coached for five years until retiring in 1938. Following his retirement, he served as advisory football coach for the Spartans of San Jose State College.

Warner brought many innovative playing mechanics to college football:

Warner died of throat cancer in Palo Alto, California, at age 83.

Head coaching record

Football

Warner in a Cornell uniform, c. 1894
"Pop" (right) with three-time All-American and University of Pittsburgh team captain Bob Peck during the 1916 season. That year, Pitt would outscore its opponents 255–25 along the way to an 8–0 record and a consensus national championship.
Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1895–1896)
1895 Georgia 3–4 2–4
1896 Georgia 4–0 3–0 T–1st
Georgia: 7–4 5–4
Cornell Big Red (Independent) (1897–1898)
1897 Cornell 5–3–1
1898 Cornell 10–2
Carlisle Indians (Independent) (1899–1903)
1899 Carlisle 9–2
1900 Carlisle 6–4–1
1901 Carlisle 5–7–1
1902 Carlisle 8–3
1903 Carlisle 11–2–1
Cornell Big Red (Independent) (1904–1906)
1904 Cornell 7–3
1905 Cornell 6–4
1906 Cornell 8–1–2
Cornell: 36–13–3
Carlisle Indians (Independent) (1907–1914)
1907 Carlisle 10–1
1908 Carlisle 11–2–1[n 1]
1909 Carlisle 8–3–1
1910 Carlisle 8–6
1911 Carlisle 11–1
1912 Carlisle 12–1–1
1913 Carlisle 10–1–1
1914 Carlisle 5–9–1
Carlisle: 114–42–8[n 1]
Pittsburgh Panthers (Independent) (1915–1923)
1915 Pittsburgh 8–0
1916 Pittsburgh 8–0
1917 Pittsburgh 10–0
1918 Pittsburgh 4–1
1919 Pittsburgh 6–2–1
1920 Pittsburgh 6–0–2
1921 Pittsburgh 5–3–1
1922 Pittsburgh 8–2
1923 Pittsburgh 5–4
Pittsburgh: 60–12–4
Stanford Indians (Pacific Coast Conference) (1924–1932)
1924 Stanford 7–1–1 3–0–1 1st L Rose
1925 Stanford 7–2 4–1 2nd
1926 Stanford 10–0–1 4–0 1st T Rose
1927 Stanford 8–2–1 4–0–1 T–1st W Rose
1928 Stanford 8–3–1 4–1–1 3rd
1929 Stanford 9–2 5–1 2nd
1930 Stanford 9–1–1 4–1 3rd
1931 Stanford 7–2–2 2–2–1 T–5th
1932 Stanford 6–4–1 1–3–1 7th
Stanford: 71–17–8
Temple Owls (Independent) (1933–1938)
1933 Temple 5–3
1934 Temple 7–1–2 L Sugar
1935 Temple 7–3
1936 Temple 6–3–2
1937 Temple 3–2–4
1938 Temple 3–6–1
Temple: 31–18–9
Total: 319–106–32[n 1]
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f The NCAA credits Warner with a career football coaching record of 319–106–32. The College Football Data Warehouse gives him one fewer win with the Carlisle Indians in 1908 for a career record of 318–106–32. Neither includes the five seasons at Iowa State (1895–1899) during which time Warner co-coached the Cyclones to a record of 18–8 while he simultaneously coached at three other schools.

References

  1. ^ Carroll, Bob (1980). "The First Football World Series". Coffin Corner (Professional Football Researchers Association) 2 (Annual): 1–8. 
  2. ^ Reed, Thomas Walter (1949). Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. History of the University of Georgia; Chapter XVII: Athletics at the University from the Beginning Through 1947 imprint pages 3441
  3. ^ Reed, Thomas Walter (c. 1949). "Chapter XI: The Administration of Chancellor William E. Boggs Through the Session of 1898". History of the University of Georgia.  
  4. ^ 2006 Iowas State Cyclone Football, page 126
  5. ^ Cornell Chronicle 9–18–97
  6. ^ a b Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book.  
  7. ^ Pittsburgh Coaching Records

Further reading

  • Danzig, Allison (1956). The History of American Football: Its Great Teams, Players, and Coaches. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
  • Reed, Thomas Walter (1949). History of the University of Georgia. "Chapter XVII: Athletics at the University from the Beginning Through 1947". Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. pages 3441–3445.

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.