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Google News

 

Google News

Google News
Google News Logo with Material Design
Web address Google News
Commercial? Yes
Type of site
News
Registration Not required
Available in Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Cantonese, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malayalam, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese.
Owner Google, Inc.
Launched September 2002

Google News is a free news aggregator provided and operated by Google, selecting up-to-date news from thousands of publications.

A beta version was launched in September 2002, and released officially in January 2006.[1] The initial idea was developed by Krishna Bharat.[2][3]

Contents

  • Details 1
  • News agencies 2
  • Copyright variations 3
  • Features and customization 4
  • News Archive Search 5
  • Coverage artifacts 6
  • See also 7
  • Notes 8
  • External links 9

Details

Google News watches more than 4500[4] news sources worldwide. Versions for more than 60 regions in 28 languages were available in March 2012. As of September 2015, service is offered in the following 35 languages: Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Cantonese, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malayalam, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese.[5]

The service covers news articles appearing within the past 30 days on various news websites. In total, Google News aggregates content from more than 25,000 publishers.[6] For the English language, it covers about 4,500 sites;[7] for other languages, fewer. Its front page provides roughly the first 200 characters of the article and a link to its larger content. Websites may or may not require a subscription; sites requiring subscription are noted in the article description.[8]

On December 1, 2009, Google announced changes to their "first click free" program,[9] which has been running since 2008 and allows users to find and read articles behind a paywall. The reader's first click to the content is free, and the number after that would be set by the content provider.[10]

The layout of Google News underwent a major revision on May 16, 2011.

On July 14, 2011, Google introduced "Google News Badges,"[11] which it later retired in October 2012.[12]

Additionally in July 2011, the Sci/Tech section of the English Google News versions was split up into two sections: Science and Technology. It was announced that this section split would be performed on other language versions as well.[13] As of early 2013, this split had not been applied to all language versions of Google News.

News agencies

In March 2005, Agence France-Presse (AFP) sued Google for $17.5 million, alleging that Google News infringed on its copyright because "Google includes AFP’s photos, stories and news headlines on Google News without permission from Agence France Presse".[14][15] It was also alleged that Google ignored a cease and desist order, though Google counters that it has opt-out procedures which AFP could have followed but did not. Google now hosts Agence France-Presse news, as well as the Associated Press, Press Association and the Canadian Press. This arrangement started in August 2007.[16] In 2007, Google announced it was paying for Associated Press content displayed in Google News, however the articles are not permanently archived.[17][18] That arrangement ceased on December 23, 2009 when Google News ceased carrying Associated Press content.[19]

Copyright variations

In 2007, a Belgian court ruled that Google did not have the right to display the lead paragraph from French-language Belgian news sources when Google aggregated news stories.[20]

Newspapers representing more than 90 percent of the market in Brazil opted out of having their links appear in Google News according to reports, resulting in only a "negligible" drop in traffic.[21] Some Europe-based news outlets have asked their governments to consider making Google pay to host links.

In December 2014 Google announced it would be shutting down the Google News service in Spain.[22] A new law in Spain, lobbied for by the Spanish newspaper publishers' association AEDE, would require that news aggregators would have to pay news services for the right to use snippets of their stories on Google News.[23] Rather than add advertisements to the news site, Google chose to shut down their service, and remove all links to Spain-based news sites from international versions of the site.[24]

Features and customization

Google News provides searching, and the choice of sorting the results by date and time of publishing (not to be confused with date and time of the news' happening) or grouping them (and also grouping without searching). In the English versions, there are options to tailor the grouping to a selected national audience.

Users can request e-mail "alerts" on various keyword topics by subscribing to Google News Alerts. E-mails are sent to subscribers whenever news articles matching their requests come online. Alerts are also available via RSS and Atom feeds.

Users used to be able to customize the displayed sections, their location on the page, and how many stories are visible with a JavaScript-based drag and drop interface. However, for the US site, this has been disabled in favor of a new layout; roll-out of this layout is planned for other locales in the near future. Stories from different editions of Google News can be combined to form one personalized page, with the options stored in a cookie. The service has been integrated with Google Search History since November 2005. Upon its graduation from beta, a section was added that displays recommended news based on the user's Google News search history and the articles the user has clicked on (if the user has signed up for Search History).

News Archive Search

On June 6, 2006, Google News expanded, adding a News Archive Search feature, offering users historical archives going back more than 200 years from some of its sources. There was a timeline view available, to select news from various years.

An expansion of the service was announced on September 8, 2008, when Google News began to offer indexed content from scanned newspapers.[25] The depth of chronological coverage varies; beginning in 2008, the entire content of the New York Times back to its founding in 1851 has been available.

In early 2010, Google removed direct access to the archive search from the main Google News page, advanced news search page and default search results pages. These pages indicated that the search covered "Any time", but did not include the archive and only included recent news.

During the summer of 2010, Google decided to redesign the format of the Google news page, creating a firestorm of complaints.[26]

In May 2011, Google cancelled plans to scan further old newspapers. About 60 million newspaper pages had been scanned prior to this event.[27] Google announced that it would instead focus on "Google One Pass, a platform that enables publishers to sell content and subscriptions directly from their own sites".[28]

In August 2011, the "News Archive Advanced Search" functionality was removed entirely, again generating complaints from regular users who found that the changes rendered the service unusable.[29] Archival newspaper articles could still be accessed via the Google News Search page, but key functionalities such as the timeline view and ability to specify more than 10 results per page were removed.

Coverage artifacts

On September 7, 2008, United Airlines, which was the subject of an indexed, archived article, lost and later not quite regained US$1 billion in market value when a 2002 Chicago Tribune article about the bankruptcy filing of the airline in that year appeared in the current "most viewed" category on the website of the Sun-Sentinel, a sister paper.[30] Google News index's next pass found the link as new news, and Income Security Advisors found the Google result to be new news, which was passed along to Bloomberg News, where it was briefly a current headline and very widely viewed.[30]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Krishna Bharat, "And now, News", The Official Google Blog, January 23, 2006. "We're taking Google News out of beta! When we launched the English-language edition in September 2002, we entered untested waters with a grand experiment in news browsing – using computers to organize the world's news in real time and providing a bird's eye view of what's being reported on virtually any topic. By presenting news "clusters" (related articles in a group), we thought it would encourage readers to get a broader perspective by digging deeper into the news – reading ten articles instead of one, perhaps – and then gain a better understanding of the issues, which could ultimately benefit society. A bit more than three years later, we offer 22 regional editions in 10 languages, and have a better sense of how people use Google News". Accessed June 19, 2008.
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ Spreading the News in New Languages
  6. ^
  7. ^ As used to be reported by Google. See also Segev, Elad (2010). Google and the Digital Divide: The Biases of Online Knowledge, Oxford: Chandos Publishing.
  8. ^
  9. ^ http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2008/10/first-click-free-for-web-search.html
  10. ^
  11. ^ Google News Badges? We Don’t Need No Stinking Google News Badges
  12. ^ http://phys.org/news/2012-09-google-news-badges-house.html
  13. ^
  14. ^ [1]
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^ The majority Dutch-language press is fully included in Google News
  21. ^
  22. ^ Google News to close up shop in Spain in response to new law
  23. ^ Google News Spain to close in response to story links 'tax
  24. ^ Google to shut Spanish news service
  25. ^
  26. ^
  27. ^ http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/05/20/google_ends_newspaper_scanning_project/
  28. ^
  29. ^
  30. ^ a b

External links

  • Official website
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