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Half-open file

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Title: Half-open file  
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Subject: Open file, Chess strategy, Rook (chess), Chess, Outline of chess
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Half-open file

In chess, a half-open file (or semi-open file) is a file with only pawns of one color. The half-open file can provide a line of attack for a player's rook or queen. A half-open file is exploited by the player with no pawns on it.

Many openings, such as the Sicilian Defense, aim to complicate the position. In the main line Sicilian, 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 (or 2...e6, or 2...Nc6) 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4, White obtains a half-open d-file, but Black can pressure White along the half-open c-file.

The demolition of the pawn structure is a common theme in positions with half-open files, since doubled pawns or isolated pawns may create half-open files.

Contents

  • Example 1
  • See also 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4

Example

V. Wely–Polgár, Hoogeeven 1997
a b c d e f g h
8
b8 black bishop
f8 black rook
g8 black king
b7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
b5 white knight
d5 black pawn
a4 white pawn
c4 black knight
d4 white bishop
e4 black knight
g4 black queen
e3 white pawn
g3 white pawn
a2 white rook
f2 white pawn
g2 white king
h2 white knight
h1 white queen
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h

The game Loek van WelyJudit Polgár, Hoogeveen, 1997[1] demonstrates the power of half-open files in attacks. Despite having one fewer pawn than White, Black's possession of two powerful half-open files (her rook on the f-file and queen on the g-file) gives her a winning advantage.

Black played 30...Rxf2+! and White resigned, anticipating 31.Rxf2 Qxg3+ 32.Kf1 Qxf2#.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Loek Van Wely vs Judit Polgar, It (cat.16) 1997

References

  •  


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