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Haul truck

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Title: Haul truck  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: BelAZ 75710, Unit Rig, Minecart, Bucyrus MT6300AC, Caterpillar 797F
Collection: Haul Trucks
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Haul truck

Haul truck in Quebec, Canada, with people for scale

Haul trucks are off-highway, rigid dump trucks specifically engineered for use in high-production mining and heavy-duty construction environments.

Contents

  • Description 1
  • Ultra class 2
  • Examples 3
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6

Description

Most haul trucks have a two-axle design, but two very well known models from the 1970s, the 350T TerexTitan and 235TWabco 3200/B, had three axles. [1] Haul truck capacities range from 40 short tons (36 t) to 400 short tons (363 t).

Large quarry-sized trucks range from 40 to 100 tons. A good example of this is the Caterpillar 775 (rated at 70 short tons (64 t)). Quarry operations are typically smaller than, say, a gold/copper mine, and require smaller trucks.

Ultra class

Liebherr T 282B ultra class haul truck.

The largest, highest-payload-capacity haul trucks are referred to as ultra class trucks. The ultra class includes all haul trucks with a payload capacity of 300 short tons (272 t) or greater.[2] As of October 2013, the BelAZ 75710 has the highest payload capacity, 450 metric tons.[3]

Examples

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Off-Highway Trucks from Caterpillar 2009.
  2. ^ Orleman 2000, p. 15.
  3. ^ Rogan, Alexander (5 March 2013). "BelAZ to build 450-tonne dump truck in 2013". 

References

  • Orleman, Eric C. (2000-11-10). Johnson, Paul, ed. Building Giant Earthmovers. Motorbooks Colortech. United State of America: MBI Publishing Company.  
  • "Off-Highway Trucks from Caterpillar". Caterpillar Website. Caterpillar Inc. 2009. Archived from the original on 2009-10-21. Retrieved 2009-10-21. Developed specifically for high production mining and heavy-duty construction applications ... 



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