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Heckfield Place

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Heckfield Place

Heckfield Place is an 18th-century[1] Heckfield, Hampshire, England.

The original manor house was the home of Lord Eversley, Charles Shaw-Lefevre,[2] the second longest serving speaker of the House of Commons. Upon Lord Eversley's death in 1888, the estate was occupied by Lieutenant Colonel Horace Walpole and his family.[3]

In the 1980s, Heckfield Place was purchased by the Thales Group, who greatly expanded it as a commercial conference and training centre. Until 2002, it was run as Thales Commercial University. However, in that year, the estate was sold and is now run privately as a conference centre and wedding venue. The house is a Grade II listed building.[1] The building underwent major refurbishment[4] from 2011 and completed in March 2013.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b "Detailed Record: Heckfield Place".  
  2. ^ The London Gazette: no. 21981. p. 1103. 24 March 1857.
  3. ^ Page, William (1911). A History of the County of Hampshire: Volume 4. pp. 44–51. 
  4. ^ Janet Harmer (2011). "Heckfield Place to become 'world-class' luxury retreat in Hampshire". Caterer and Hotelkeeper. Retrieved 2012-06-14. 
  5. ^ "Heckfield Place". 2012. Retrieved 2012-06-14. 

Heckfield Place is an 18th-century[1] Georgian country estate in Heckfield, Hampshire, England.

The original manor house was the home of Lord Eversley, Charles Shaw-Lefevre,[2] the second longest serving speaker of the House of Commons. Upon Lord Eversley's death in 1888, the estate was occupied by Lieutenant Colonel Horace Walpole and his family.[3]

In the 1980s, Heckfield Place was purchased by the Thales Group, who greatly expanded it as a commercial conference and training centre. Until 2002, it was run as Thales Commercial University. However, in that year, the estate was sold and is now run privately as a conference centre and wedding venue. The house is a Grade II listed building.[1] The building underwent major refurbishment[4] from 2011 and as of July 2015 it is still not finished.

External links

  • Heckfield Place


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