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Henry Montgomery Campbell

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Henry Montgomery Campbell

For other people named Henry Campbell, see Henry Campbell (disambiguation).
Henry Montgomery Campbell
MC KCVO PC
Bishop of London
Church Church of England
Diocese Diocese of London
Elected 1956
Term ended 1961
Predecessor William Wand
Successor Robert Stopford
Other posts Bishop of Guildford
1949–1956
Bishop of Kensington
1942–1949
Bishop of Willesden
1940–1942
Orders
Ordination 1910
Consecration c. 1949
Personal details
Born (1887-10-11)11 October 1887
Died 26 December 1970(1970-12-26) (aged 83)
Denomination Anglican
Alma mater Brasenose College, Oxford

Henry Colville Montgomery Campbell MC KCVO PC (11 October 1887 – 26 December 1970) was a Church of England bishop. He was the Bishop of London from 1956 to 1961.[1]

Early life and ordained ministry

He was educated at Malvern College[2] and Brasenose College, Oxford. After a period of study at Wells Theological College he was ordained in 1910, his first post being a curacy at Alverstoke. After distinguished wartime service in which he received the Military Cross for bravery at Gallipolli,[3] he held Vicar incumbencies at Poplar, London, Hackney and Hornsey where he was additionally Rural Dean)[1],[4]

Episcopal ministry

Campbell was ordained to the episcopate as the suffragan Bishop of Willesden in 1940 and translated to be the Bishop of Kensington in 1942. He became a diocesan bishop when he became the Bishop of Guildford in 1949 and later became the Bishop of London in 1956, in which position he also became a Privy Councillor. A modest man, he said of his bishoprics,
"Sometimes you need a man like me – one who is no figure in public life and no scholar – but simply and solely a Father in God who goes round the parishes visiting the chaps: the only thing I am any good at."[3]

He died on 26 December 1970 due to contracting bronchial pneumonia after fracturing his thigh during a power cut.[5]

Notes

Anglicanism portal
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Guy Smith
Bishop of Willesden
1940–1942
Succeeded by
Edward Jones
Preceded by
Bertram Simpson
Bishop of Kensington
1942–1949
Succeeded by
Cyril Easthaugh
Preceded by
John Macmillan
Bishop of Guildford
1949–1956
Succeeded by
Ivor Watkins
Preceded by
William Wand
Bishop of London
1956–1961
Succeeded by
Robert Stopford


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