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Hypertrophy

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Title: Hypertrophy  
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Subject: Cardiology, Cellular adaptation, Diastolic heart failure, Dysplasia, Metaplasia
Collection: Anatomical Pathology, Exercise Physiology, Muscular System, Physical Exercise, Tissues (Biology)
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Hypertrophy

Hypertrophy
Hypertrophy results from an increase in cell size, whereas hyperplasia stems from an increase in cell number
Classification and external resources
MeSH D006984
Forensic post-mortem examination of a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, showing thickening of the cardiac muscle.
Hypertrophy

(from Greek ὑπέρ "excess" + τροφή "nourishment") is the increase in the volume of an organ or tissue due to the enlargement of its component cells. It is distinguished from hyperplasia, in which the cells remain approximately the same size but increase in number. Although hypertrophy and hyperplasia are two distinct processes, they frequently occur together, such as in the case of the hormonally-induced proliferation and enlargement of the cells of the uterus during pregnancy.

Eccentric hypertrophy is a type of hypertrophy where the walls and chamber of a hollow organ undergo growth in which the overall size and volume are enlarged. It is applied especially to the left ventricle of heart.[1] Sarcomeres are added in series, as for example in dilated cardiomyopathy (in contrast to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a type of concentric hypertrophy, where sarcomeres are added in parallel).

See also

References

  1. ^ Kusumoto, F. M. (2004), Cardiovascular Pathophysiology, Hayes Barton Press, pp. 20–22,  

External links

  • University of California Muscle Physiology Home Page: Hypertrophy


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