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Incubator (culture)

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Title: Incubator (culture)  
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Subject: Live cell imaging, Spiral plater, Reverse transfection, Vacuum dry box, Retort stand
Collection: Cell Biology, Laboratory Equipment, Medical Equipment, Microbiology Equipment
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Incubator (culture)

A Bacteriological incubator
Interior of a CO2 incubator used in cell culture

In biology, an incubator is a device used to grow and maintain microbiological cultures or cell cultures. The incubator maintains optimal temperature, humidity and other conditions such as the carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen content of the atmosphere inside. Incubators are essential for a lot of experimental work in cell biology, microbiology and molecular biology and are used to culture both bacterial as well as eukaryotic cells.

Incubators are also used in the poultry industry to act as a substitute for hens. This often results in higher hatch rates due to the ability to control both temperature and humidity. Various brands of incubators are commercially available to breeders.

The simplest incubators are insulated boxes with an adjustable heater, typically going up to 60 to 65 °C (140 to 150 °F), though some can go slightly higher (generally to no more than 100 °C). The most commonly used temperature both for bacteria such as the frequently used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a growth temperature of 30 °C is optimal.

More elaborate incubators can also include the ability to lower the temperature (via refrigeration), or the ability to control

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