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Khrushchevism

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Title: Khrushchevism  
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Khrushchevism

Mao Zedong (left) and Nikita Khrushchev (right). Initially Mao and Khrushchev had a positive relationship; Mao credited Khrushchev with developing his own distinct Marxist-Leninist ideology that Mao called "Khrushchevism", and he sought to model China upon Khrushchev's policies in the Soviet Union. This ended after disputes arose between China and the Soviet Union.

Khrushchevism is a form of Marxism-Leninism based on the theories and policies of Nikita Khrushchev and his administration in the Soviet Union.[1][2][3] Mao Zedong recognized "Khrushchevism" as a distinct ideology, initially from a positive perspective, though later the term was used by the Chinese Communists as a term of derision against the politics of the Soviet Union.[4][5]

Khrushchevism involves the rejection of Stalinism and particularly represents a movement away from Stalinist politics, including advocating a more liberal tolerance of some cultural dissent and deviance, a more welcoming international relations policy and attitude towards foreigners, and a repudiation of Stalinist arbitrariness and terror tactics.[6] Khrushchevism was not only a phenomenon in the Soviet Union; Khrushchevism was initially admired in China and Mao Zedong sought to model the Chinese Marxist-Leninist state upon principles developed by Khrushchevism; however, disputes with the Soviet Union later ended friendly relations between Mao and Khrushchev.[7]

References

  1. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 1-5. Describes the term "Khrushchevism"
  2. ^ Milorad M. Drachkovitch. Marxism in the Modern World. Stanford, California, USA: Stanford University Press, 1965. Pp. 108. (Describes "Krushchevism")
  3. ^ Jeremy Smith. Khrushchevism after Khrushchev: The rise of national interest in the Eastern Bloc by Katalin Miklossy, Khrushchev in the Kremlin: policy and government in the Soviet Union, 1953-1964. Oxon, England, UK; New York, New York, USA: Routledge, 2011. Pp. 150.
  4. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 6-8.
  5. ^ University of California Press; London, England, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1968. Pp. 33. Shows the later use by the Chinese Communists of "Khrushchevism" as a term of derision.
  6. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 5.
  7. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 6-8.
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