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Latin Archbishopric of Corinth

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Latin Archbishopric of Corinth

The Latin Archbishopric of Corinth is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church. It dates to 1210, when a Catholic archbishop was installed on the Orthodox Metropolis of Corinth, in southern Greece, in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade. Since the Byzantine reconquest in the early 15th century, and except for a brief period of Venetian rule in 1688–1715, it has been awarded as a titular see. It is vacant since 2005.

History

The See of Corinth has a long history, and is held to have been founded by the Apostle Paul.[1] In the Roman and early Byzantine periods, Corinth was the capital and metropolitan see of the province of Achaea (southern Greece).[1][2] From the early 9th century, however, the primacy of Corinth over the Peloponnese was challenged by the See of Patras, and from the 10th century on the jurisdiction of the See of Corinth was restricted to the eastern Peloponnese and certain of the Ionian Islands.[2]

In 1203/4, the city fell to the lord of the Argolid, Leo Sgouros, who used the weakness of the Byzantine government and the turmoil of the Fourth Crusade to carve out for himself a practically independent state in southern and central Greece.[3] Sgouros' ambitions to create a state of his own were checked by the onslaught of the victorious Crusaders, who captured Corinth in 1210 after a long siege.[4][5]

The Crusaders established a Roman Catholic ("Latin") Archbishopric to replace the Greek Orthodox see, covering the same territory: the seven suffragan sees of Cephalonia, Zakynthos, Damala, Lacedaemon/Monemvasia, Argos, Helos and Zemena.[6] In reality, Monemvasia and Helos were not to come under Latin control until thirty years later, and the Latin clergy had difficulty imposing itself on the rural Greek population and priesthood. As a result, the sees of Damala, Helos and Zemena seem to have never been occupied,[7] and Zemena and one half of Damala came to form part of the diocese of Corinth itself.[8] Along with its rival, the Latin Archbishop of Patras, the Archbishop of Corinth ranked as one of the two senior ecclesiastic barons in the Principality of Achaea, with eight knight's fiefs attached to him (and four each for the suffragan bishops of Argos and Lacedaemon).[9] Nevertheless, despite its ancestry and prestige, Corinth was rapidly eclipsed by Patras during the period of Frankish rule.[10]

Le Quien (III, 883) mentions twenty Latin prelates from 1210 to 1700, but Eubel (I, 218; II, 152) mentions twenty-two archbishops for the period from 1212 to 1476.[1] The city was recovered by the Byzantine Despotate of the Morea in 1395, and, after a short period (1397–1404) of rule by the Knights Hospitaller, returned to Byzantine hands, where it remained until it fell to the Ottoman Empire on 8 August 1458.[2] After this the Catholic see remained as a titular see.

The Archbishopric of Corinth became once more the centre of the Catholic Church in the Peloponnese during the brief period of Venetian rule in 1688–1715, while the Orthodox Metropolis of Patras remained the centre of the local Orthodox Church.[11]

Archbishops in Corinth

Name Tenure
Walter 1212 – after 1215
Unknown 10 June 1224 – ?
Unknown 1228
Peter of Confluenzia February 1268 – 5 April 1278
William of Moerbeke 9 April 1278 – ?
Robert 22 October 1286 – ?
Matthew of Osenio ca. 1294
Louis ca. 1300
John of Spoleto 18 January 1306 – 5 June 1307 (Apostolic Administrator)
James 5 June 1307 – ?
Bartholomew ca. 1312
James ca. 1340 – 7 January 1349
Francis of Massa 29 March 1349 – ?
Paul 15 March 1363 – ca. 1379
Matthew 19 September 1386 – ?
Stephen 8 July 1390 – 15 March 1395
Peter John 26 April 1395 - 12 January 1396
Biagio 12 January 1396 – ?
John ca. 25 June 1407
Antony ?
Peter Rainaldi 14 February 1421 – ?

Titular Archbishops

Name Tenure
Marco Antonio Saraco 31 July 1476 – ?
Giulio de Blanchis ca. 1512 – ?
Juan de Sepúlveda 1517 – ?
Alfonso Paleotti 13 February 1591 – 23 July 1597
Dominique de Vic 1625 – 29. Oktober 1629
Jean François Paul de Gondi 5 October 1643 – 21 March 1654
Carlo Bonelli 16 October 1656 – 15 April 1665
Giacomo Filippo Nini 28 April 1664 – 15 March 1666
Stefano Ugolini 29 March 1666 – 18 April 1667
Galeazzo Marescotti 27 February 1668 – 23 March 1676
Francesco Martelli 9 September 1675 – 21 July 1698
Leonardo Balsarini 19 December 1698 – 1699
Angelo Maria Carlini 11 December 1702 – 1715
Mondilio Orsini (Mundillus Orsini) 26 June 1724 – 20 November 1724
Giuseppe Spinelli 5 September 1725 – 15 December 1734
Giovanni Francesco Stoppani 14 March 1735 – 20 May 1754
Antonius Biglia 22 July 1754 – 29 November 1755
François Mattei 28 March 1757 – 13 March 1758
Henry Benedict Mary Clement Stuart of York 2 October 1758 – 13 July 1761
Marcantonio Colonna 19 April 1762 – 20 September 1784
Ippolito Antonio Vincenti Mareri 11 April 1785 – 21 February 1794
Giuseppe Maria Spina 10 June 1798 – 24 May 1802
Dionisio Ridolfini Conestabile 9 August 1802 – 26 September 1803
Giovanni Giacomo Antonio Gaetano Fraschina 26 March 1804 – 27 March 1837
Giuseppe Angelini 21 December 1868 – ?
Cesare Sambucetti 1 April 1882 – March 1911
Pio Armando Pietro Sabadel 27 November 1911 – ?
Bonaventura Cerretti 10 May 1914 – 14 December 1925
Louis Petit 24 June 1926 – 5 November 1927
Ettore Felici 6 November 1927 – 9 May 1951
Gennaro Verolino 5 September 1951 – 17 November 2005

References

  1. ^ a b c  
  2. ^ a b c Gregory (1991), pp. 531–533
  3. ^ Setton (1975), pp. 21–24
  4. ^ Bon (1969), pp. 56–59
  5. ^ Setton (1975), pp. 22–25, 36
  6. ^ Setton (1975), pp. 36–38
  7. ^ Bon (1969), pp. 93–94
  8. ^ Bon (1969), pp. 478–480
  9. ^ Bon (1969), p. 114
  10. ^ Bon (1969), p. 92
  11. ^ Vakalopoulos (1975), p. 209

Sources

  • Pius Bonifacius Gams, Series episcoporum Ecclesiae Catholicae, Leipzig 1931, pp. 430-431
  • Konrad Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, vol. 1, p. 210; vol. 2, p. 136; vol. 3, p. 178; vol. 4, pp. 164-165; vol. 5, p. 173; vol. 6, p. 183
  • "Corinthe", in Dictionnaire d'Histoire et de Géographie ecclésiastiques, vol. XIII, Paris 1956, coll. 876-880

External links

  • Corinthus, at catholic-hierarchy.org
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