Law enforcement in Moldova

Mounted Moldovan police in a park.

In 1995 the national police of Moldova were under the direction of the Ministry of Interior. Internal troops were reported to have 2,500 men, and the numbers of riot police were put at 900.

The scope and quality of Moldova's state security apparatus were difficult to determine. Like the armed forces, local assets of the former Moldavian KGB were transferred to the new government along with those personnel who wished to enter the service of the new government. These elements now function under the republic's control as the Ministry of National Security.

Contents

  • Ill-treatment by police 1
  • See also 2
  • External links 3
  • References 4

Ill-treatment by police

Torture and ill-treatment in Moldova remain widespread and systemic despite some initial legislative steps made by the government to change police practices in order to eradicate it, Amnesty International said in October 2007.[1]

"Although efforts have been made to bring legislation into line with international and European standards, practice and attitudes are lagging behind. Beatings and abuse of detainees remain the norm. Channels for seeking redress stay blocked. Lack of transparency breeds impunity," Amnesty Internationals researcher said.[2]

The events during the April 2009 Moldova civil unrest have drawn criticism of human rights violations, including in regard to the deaths of Valeriu Boboc, Ion Ţâbuleac, and Eugen Ţapu

See also

Crime:

External links

Moldova Police

References

  1. ^ """Moldova: Police torture and ill-treatment: "It's just normal.. Amnesty International. 23 October 2007. 
  2. ^ "Moldova: Urgent measures needed to stop torture or other ill-treatment". Amnesty International USA. 23 October 2007. 
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