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Loam

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Title: Loam  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Soil, Mudbrick, Lute (material), Geotechnical engineering, Permeability (earth sciences)
Collection: Soil, Types of Soil
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Loam

Fine, rich loam field ideal for farming vegetables in the UK

Loam is water are crucial.[2]

Bricks made of loam, mud, sand, and water, with an added binding material such as rice husks or straw, have been used in construction since ancient times.

Use in farming

Loam is considered ideal for gardening and agricultural uses because it retains nutrients well and retains water while still allowing excess water to drain away.[3] A soil dominated by one or two of the three particle size groups can behave like loam if it has a strong granular structure, promoted by a high content of organic matter. However, a soil that meets the textural definition of loam can lose its characteristic desirable qualities when it is compacted, depleted of organic matter, or has clay dispersed throughout its fine-earth fraction.

Loam is found in a majority of successful farms in regions around the world known for their fertile land. Loam soil feels soft and crumbly and is easy to work over a wide range of moisture conditions.

Use in house construction

Loam may be used for the construction of houses, for example in loam post and beam construction.[4] Building crews can build a layer of loam on the inside of walls, which can help to control air humidity. Loam, combined with straw, can be used as a rough construction material to build walls. This is one of the oldest technologies for house construction in the world. Within this there are two broad methods: the use of rammed earth, or unfired bricks (adobe).[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^
  3. ^ B. Rosie Lerner, "What is Loam?", Purdue University Consumer Horticulture, 6 January 2000. Retrieved 17 December 2012.
  4. ^
  5. ^ Gerhard Koch, "Loam Construction – from a niche product to an industrial building system". Tokyo: Action for Sustainability – The 2005 World Sustainable Building Conference in Tokyo, Japan, September 2005. Retrieved 17 December 2012. Link broken, 2015/05/09

External links

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