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Madras, Oregon

Madras, Oregon
City
Elementary school in Madras
Elementary school in Madras
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Oregon
County Jefferson
Incorporated 1911
Government
 • Mayor Royce W. Embanks, Jr.
Area[1]
 • Total 5.02 sq mi (13.00 km2)
 • Land 5.02 sq mi (13.00 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 2,242 ft (683 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 6,046
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 6,351
 • Density 1,204.4/sq mi (465.0/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97741
Area code(s) 541
FIPS code 41-45250[2]
GNIS feature ID 1145724[4]
Website ci.madras.or.us

Madras ( ) is a city in Jefferson County, Oregon, United States. Originally called "The Basin" after the circular valley the city is located in, it is unclear as to whether Madras was named in 1903 for the cotton fabric called "Madras" that originated in the Madras area in India, or from the city of Chennai, then known as "Madras".[5] The population was 6,046 at the 2010 census.[6] It is the county seat of Jefferson County.[7]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Sights 2
  • Geography and climate 3
  • Demographics 4
    • 2010 census 4.1
    • 2000 census 4.2
  • Infrastructure 5
    • Transportation 5.1
  • Environmental issues 6
  • Notable people 7
  • Sister city 8
  • See also 9
  • References 10
  • External links 11

History

Madras was incorporated as a city in 1911. An Army Air Corps base was built nearby during World War II. This airfield now serves as City-County Airport. Homesteads about 5 miles (8 km) north of the city on Agency Plains were based on dryland wheat.

Sights

Madras is home to the Erickson Aircraft Collection, a privately owned collection of airworthy vintage aircraft. The collection is open to the public Tuesday through Sunday, 10:00 o'clock a.m. to 5:00 o'clock p.m.[8]

Geography and climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.02 square miles (13.00 km2), all of it land.[1]

Climate data for Madras, Oregon (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41.7
(5.4)
45.8
(7.7)
54.1
(12.3)
60.4
(15.8)
68.4
(20.2)
76.4
(24.7)
85.8
(29.9)
85.5
(29.7)
76.3
(24.6)
62.9
(17.2)
48.7
(9.3)
39.9
(4.4)
62.2
(16.8)
Average low °F (°C) 25.7
(−3.5)
26.9
(−2.8)
30.0
(−1.1)
33.5
(0.8)
39.8
(4.3)
45.6
(7.6)
50.6
(10.3)
50.2
(10.1)
43.8
(6.6)
36.1
(2.3)
30.0
(−1.1)
24.1
(−4.4)
36.4
(2.4)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.54
(39.1)
1.13
(28.7)
0.97
(24.6)
1.10
(27.9)
1.19
(30.2)
0.78
(19.8)
0.53
(13.5)
0.38
(9.7)
0.45
(11.4)
0.81
(20.6)
1.46
(37.1)
1.92
(48.8)
12.26
(311.4)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 4.3
(10.9)
2.9
(7.4)
1.1
(2.8)
0.1
(0.3)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
1.5
(3.8)
5.6
(14.2)
15.5
(39.4)
Source: NOAA[9]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 6,046 people, 2,198 households, and 1,430 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,204.4 inhabitants per square mile (465.0/km2). There were 2,569 housing units at an average density of 511.8 per square mile (197.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.4% White, 0.7% African American, 6.9% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 19.7% from other races, and 5.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 38.5% of the population.[2]

There were 2,198 households of which 41.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 15.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.9% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.31.[2]

The median age in the city was 31.2 years. 30.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.1% were from 25 to 44; 21.6% were from 45 to 64; and 10.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.[2]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 5,078 people, 1,801 households, and 1,251 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,326.9 people per square mile (899.4/km²). There were 1,952 housing units at an average density of 894.5 per square mile (345.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.55% White, 0.59% African American, 6.14% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.35% Pacific Islander, 24.56% from other races, and 4.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 35.74% of the population.[2]

There were 1,801 households out of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.32.[2]

In the city the population was spread out with 33.1% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 16.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.[2]

The median income for a household in the city was $29,103, and the median income for a family was $33,275. Males had a median income of $27,656 versus $19,464 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,937. About 15.2% of families and 19.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.3% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.[2]

Infrastructure

Transportation

Highway
Rail
Air

In addition to the public City-County Airport, Madras has several private use airports in the area:

Environmental issues

In 2003, a Scotts Company large field trial of GMO bentgrass near Madras resulted in pollen spreading the transgene, which is Roundup resistance, over an area of 310 km2.[13] Because the grower could not remove all genetically engineered plants, the U.S. Department of Agriculture fined the grower $500 thousand for non compliance with regulations in 2007.[14]

Notable people

Sister city

Madras has one sister city,[17] as designated by Sister Cities International:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  5. ^ "How did Madras get its name?". The Bulletin. Aug 20, 1958. p. 21. Retrieved 18 August 2015. 
  6. ^ "Certified Population Estimates for Oregon's Cities and Towns" (PDF). Population Research Center. Portland State University. March 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-29. 
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ Erickson Aircraft Collection website
  9. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data".  
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ Moffatt, Riley. Population History of Western U.S. Cities & Towns, 1850-1990. Lanham: Scarecrow, 1996, 212.
  12. ^ "Subcounty population estimates: Oregon 2000-2007" ( 
  13. ^ Watrud, L.S., Lee, E.H., Fairbrother, A., Burdick, C., Reichman, J.R., Bollman, M., Storm, M., King, G.J., Van de Water, P.K. (2004) Evidence for landscapelevel, pollen-mediated gene flow from genetically modified creeping bentgrass with CP4 EPSPS as a marker. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101(4): 14533-14538. PMID 15448206
  14. ^ USDA USDA CONCLUDES GENETICALLY ENGINEERED CREEPING BENTGRASS INVESTIGATION USDA Assesses The Scotts Company, LLC $500,000 Civil Penalty. 26 November 2007
  15. ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/e/ellsbja01.shtml
  16. ^ http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20106732,00.html
  17. ^ http://www.sister-cities.org/icrc/directory/usa/OR

External links

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